Building knowledge and connections

Continuing Education

RCI. RCI, Incorporated - www.rci-online.org

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  • Proper building envelope design, component detailing, and wall system performance are critical in a durable, energy efficient building. One of the key aspects of achieving a highly efficient and durable building is the ability to protect the building from unwanted air and water infiltration. This course reviews the necessity and benefits of air, vapor, and moisture barriers, how moisture makes its way into the building envelope, the negative impact it can have on the structure, and different design options to control air leakage and moisture movement to ensure a high performance building.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click to view details.

  • One of the more complicated issues today in building science is addressing moisture movement, since moisture can penetrate a building in a number of different ways. By knowing and understanding the source of the water and its movement, effective solutions can be developed to eliminate or retard moisture movement. This course focuses on moisture movement below grade and the methods used to prevent and control the different types of moisture movement to provide complete below slab protection. Industry codes and standards which must be met when specifying vapor retarders/barriers are also discussed.

  • Considering that 90–95% of our time is spent indoors and that 28% of the energy demand in commercial buildings comes from lighting, proper daylighting strategies are more essential than ever. This course describes how to best harness the benefits of natural light without causing occupant discomfort, discusses how to calculate daylighting accurately, and presents case studies on the performance of daylight redirecting films.

  • Critical to concrete waterproofing are the products used in combination to create a system that ensures complete control of moisture migration. Presented here are effective concrete waterproofing technologies and how they improve the durability and lifespan of structures. Discussions include water penetration, system selection, membrane protection, and cementitious waterproofing.

  • Through sustainable management, the forests of New England have had a remarkable comeback since the 1830s, with eastern white pine being the most represented softwood in these forests. This light yet strong wood species has been used for generations and today, meets the requirements of a renewable and sustainable building material. This course reviews eastern white pine’s contribution to sustainability, its grading rules, wood products, and many applications.

  • Since ancient times, concrete mixes and carved natural stone have combined to create substance, beauty, and longevity in our architecture. Glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) was created to ensure the attributes of concrete and stone continue to be enjoyed but with the efficiency in application that is expected in today’s world of design. This course covers the evolution of GFRC, its applications and how it is custom created, its advantages, and how GFRC compares to other types of architectural concrete

  • As some of the earliest building materials, masonry and concrete have been used for their durability and strength. However, masonry architecture, both historical and contemporary, has been left vulnerable to water—the single most damaging element to masonry in our environment. This course will identify common water-related problems for masonry and concrete, describe protective treatments and their benefits, and explain the process for selecting and applying a protective treatment.

  • The metal roof edge is the most visible and one of the most critical parts of a roofing system. However, it is often overlooked and the use of untested systems is common. This course will discuss why the design, testing and performance of metal edges is critical in ensuring the viability of the entire roof system, including an in-depth look at the ANSI/SPRI ES-1 standard.

  • Redwood—one of nature’s longest-lasting, strongest, most beautiful and environmentally-friendly building materials—is commonly used for decking, siding, and timbers because of its natural beauty and resistance to decay. This course covers the sustainable attributes of redwood building products, including a discussion of redwood lumber grades, characteristics, and applications. Also presented are the results of a recent Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) comparing redwood and plastic-composite decking options and information about redwood’s Environmental Product Declaration (EPD).

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click to view details.

  • In the wake of the green movement, combined with rising energy costs, building sustainability has become an important topic. This course reviews building practices that promote better building envelope design, the codes and standards that apply to energy efficiency, and the environmental advantages of using POLYISO continuous insulation in steel stud construction.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click to view details.

  • Resiliency is a growing necessity. It is important to understand the impacts on the built environment resulting from natural and manmade disasters and disturbances and to design for those impacts now. Presented in this course is an overview of the benefits of using steel doors as part of a resilient design strategy for applications requiring resistance to blasts, tornadoes, and ballistics.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click to view details.

  • This course will discuss overall project performance from the perspective of improved steel joist design and metal decking design. This includes ways to improve the request for information (RFI) process, and ways to reduce a range of traditionally tolerated project costs. Best engineering practices, cost-accountable architectural achievement, practices that reduce the consumption of raw materials, and the importance of taking the project owner's point of view when designing the steel package will be summarized. Building information modeling (BIM) - based project collaboration will also be discussed.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click to view details.

  • From classrooms to boardrooms to living rooms, hanging display systems enhance spaces and provide design freedom. This course examines wall hanging systems with a focus on integrating systems in the overall design of a project and includes discussions on system elements, selection criteria, specialty applications, and sustainable design.

  • The key to an energy-efficient metal building is the implementation of a continuous insulation system that virtually eliminates thermal bridging and prevents condensation. This course discusses how using thermal spacer blocks and metal building insulation in the building envelope increases energy performance and meets stringent energy code requirements.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click to view details.

  • The role of a fire rated door is to maintain the integrity of a fire rated enclosure in the event of a fire, giving building occupants enough time to exit the burning building. This course is an introduction to fire rated doors and a general review of the fire codes that relate to fire doors and hardware, referencing IBC 2012 and 2015, NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) regulations, and the ADAAG (Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines).

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click to view details.

  • Deck structures provide neat and sturdy living spaces that mirror interior conveniences while set in the ultimate, great outdoors. Choosing the right deck board for a specific project requires considering the size of the project, its location, and local climate conditions. This course discusses the performance characteristics and benefits of using multi-layer, cellular PVC decking—a durable decking material that replicates the unique beauty of exotic hardwood.

  • Trim and molding occupy a small amount of space on a home’s exterior, however their aesthetic value outweighs their size. Properly designed exterior moldings and trim need a full understanding of the materials and the design rules and functions for each location. This course takes the reader through the design and installation of exterior moldings, in particular PVC molding, and looks at some common molding mistakes and solutions.

  • The roofing system can have a dramatic effect on the building’s life cycle and energy costs, as well as its overall appearance. This course explores stone coated steel roofing systems, and includes discussions on the installation methods used, testing and standards, and comparative characteristics and sustainable attributes of stone coated steel roofing versus traditional roofing materials.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click to view details.

  • Exterior shading devices offer a number of advantages that contribute to a more sustainable building, including minimizing cooling costs, reducing peak electricity demand, and controlling glare. These benefits result in greater occupant comfort and improved productivity. This course provides a review of exterior aluminum shading device systems, including the components, finishes, and design and engineering considerations, as well as a discussion of how shading strategies contribute to LEED® accreditation.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click to view details.

  • Traditionally used for high-performance architectural applications, water-based PVDF coatings can now be applied to cellular PVC cladding materials, delivering high performance in a new application. This course presents the benefits of cellular PVC as a cladding material and focuses on water-based PVDF coatings, how they work, and how their performance characteristics contribute to their durability.

  • Masonry is an ideal sustainable building construction material as it is extremely durable, recyclable, and reusable. It allows for extraordinary design versatility so it can meet both aesthetic and functional requirements. This course looks at the design elements, components, and construction techniques that characterize sustainable masonry cavity wall building envelopes.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click to view details.

  • Due to advancements in architectural decorative glass technology, the number of design options available to help designers and architects achieve the specific aesthetics and performance requirements they desire has dramatically increased. This course provides a review of architectural decorative glass including product options, applications, features, and specification considerations. Also discussed is how decorative glass can contribute to sustainable design and LEED® initiatives.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click to view details.

  • Rolling doors are used in heavy-duty, medium-duty, and light-duty applications for a wide range of commercial, industrial and construction environments. The course provides a review of the features, components, options and applications of various types of commercial rolling door products.

  • Due to their durability, low operational cost, and sustainability, metal roofs are gaining popularity in both commercial and residential markets. Owner expectations for this product family have increased as well, and now include heightened aesthetics and long-term performance. While metal roofing systems are certainly up to these challenges, when they fail, the results are costly. Consequently, it is imperative designers have full knowledge of metal roof design and detailing. This course covers the top ten problems metal roof designers face and describes how these problems can be prevented through proper design.

  • High performance buildings require envelopes with thermal, air and vapor layers that are typically installed individually and by separate contractors, adding to the complexity of their construction. Integrally insulated concrete tilt-up panels provide multiple building envelope layers in one element. In this course we’ll look at these insulated concrete walls, the types, their components, their thermal and moisture resistant properties and where they are used.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click to view details.

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