Building knowledge and connections

Continuing Education

AIC. American Institute of Constructors - www.professionalconstructor.org

Displaying 1 - 25 of 524 results.

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  • Originally developed to reduce solar heat gain from entering through a pane of glass, window films in today’s market provide UV protection, reduce glare, reduce fading, increase occupant comfort, offer safety and security, and yield energy savings. This course evaluates the performance of different types of solar control window films and offers daylighting strategies for commercial, retail, and residential building and architectural applications.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Without a doubt, the human-nature connection contributes to well-being and improves our mood. Water features are one way to extend this connection to the indoors. In this course, we’ll review the components of indoor water features, design options, and considerations and look at a few case studies.

  • Provides an overview of the history of solid surface as a decorative material with a discussion on product characteristics and attributes, and a comparison of sustainability factors of three hard surface materials and their environmental impact.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • This course introduces accessibility from Canadian and US perspectives. It covers a few specific technical accessibility requirements and compares the differences when referencing Canadian or US design standards, such as the National Building Code of Canada (Canada's Model Code) or the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) (the United States accessibility regulation), while reinforcing the intent of good design that is not always outlined by a code or standard. The seven principles of universal design are also discussed.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

     In order to download this course, a USD $29.00 fee must be paid.

  • Quartz surfacing material is one of the most durable products in the market today. While there are many surfacing options available such as natural stone, acrylic solid surface, ceramic, concrete, and laminate, none offer the flexibility, strength, durability, and endless design possibilities of a quartz surface. This course examines the characteristics, attributes, and manufacturing processes involved with quartz surfaces, explaining how they influence material performance, safety, and durability. A comparison with other surfacing options and the use of quartz surfaces in healthcare applications are also discussed.

  • Due to their durability, low operational cost, and sustainability, metal roofs are gaining popularity in both commercial and residential markets. Owner expectations for this product family have increased as well, and now include heightened aesthetics and long-term performance. While metal roofing systems are certainly up to these challenges, when they fail, the results are costly. Consequently, it is imperative designers have full knowledge of metal roof design and detailing. This course covers the top ten problems metal roof designers face and describes how these problems can be prevented through proper design.

  • When designing a steel mesh fence, there are three steel mesh options to consider: chain link fabric, expanded metal, and welded wire mesh. Although mesh choice may be the primary focus when designing fence, an understanding of the application and material specifications should be key considerations as well. This course provides a review of the material specifications, installation, and standards related to the design of steel mesh fence systems.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

  • The use of sustainable materials and products during building design will become the standard within the construction industry, and environmental product declarations (EPDs) and Health Product Declarations (HPDs) help architects and owners make informed decisions for their projects. Insulated metal panels— a prime example of a sustainable product—are one of the most cost-effective solutions to reduce energy and greenhouse gases.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Fireplaces remain one of the most desirable household features for homeowners, complementing a range of different lifestyles and appealing to a range of demographics. This course provides an overview of electric fireplaces, focusing on their design possibilities, flame technologies, ease of installation, environmental efficiency, cost-saving benefits, and their advantages over gas and wood-burning fireplaces.

  • The importance of keeping an armed intruder out of a building cannot be underestimated. Examined here are fenestration security risks, considerations, and solutions for educational, religious, commercial, and retail applications, as well as applicable performance testing and standards. The course provides an in-depth discussion on new, retrofit access-denial glazing systems that provide maximum protection against forced entry and ballistic threats.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Heated towel racks not only warm and dry damp towels, but also add a sense of comfort and luxury. This course explores heated towel racks and includes discussions on: the functions, benefits, and applications of heated towel racks; centrally heated, electric, and hydronic heating systems; materials and finishes; installation and care; and, design and accessory options.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

  • Roof glazing products can positively affect building occupants by illuminating the interior of a space, providing views to the outside, and allowing for natural ventilation. There are many factors to be considered during the product selection process to ensure performance goals are realized. Presented in this course are roof window and skylight design and performance criteria, relevant building codes and standards, and types of roof windows and skylights and their features.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

  • Concrete is a very versatile and fundamental building material; however, because it is porous and wicks water through its matrix, concrete has water-related design challenges. This program examines the sustainable benefits of integral concrete waterproofing and analyzes traditional waterproofing methods as compared to integral methods in terms of performance, durability, risk, cost, and construction timeline.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

  • This recorded webinar is the fourth of five sessions presented during the Building Science Master Summit held by DuPont Performance Building Solutions. This course covers approaches to high-performance commercial wall system design, analysis tools, and the pros and cons of different barrier options so you can make the most informed design decisions for your job. We’ll also take a look at current code requirements and testing specifications.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Floor finishes are one of the last items to be installed prior to substantial completion. Indoor environmental quality concerns related to adhesives make most project 09 flooring specifications require moisture testing before flooring can be installed on concrete slabs. When those moisture tests fail the project faces burdensome time delays and unexpected costs. This course explores concrete moisture and applied flooring, as well as several misconceptions regarding moisture testing. It provides guidance on eliminating concrete moisture problems while protecting the owner, design team, and building occupants from project delivery delays, cost overruns, future failed flooring, poor environmental conditions, and litigation.

  • Local vacuum networks are economical and sustainable systems that provide deep, stable, high-quality vacuum to a variety of lab environments. In this course, the environmental and performance benefits of local vacuum networks vs. central vacuum systems are explored, along with discussions on their components and design and installation considerations. Brief case studies are used to highlight the wide range of flexible, adaptable solutions supported by this strategy.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • The use of life safety dampers is driven by requirements in various building codes. There are many different applications for which fire, fire/smoke, smoke, and/or ceiling radiation dampers can be used, each having its own specific purpose and unique installation requirements. This course gives an in-depth look at the different types of dampers and explains how and where they're each used and installed.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • The design of behavioral healthcare facilities should address the therapeutic and safety needs of patients and staff while meeting the applicable codes and regulations. Reviewed in this course are ligature-resistant products developed for patient rooms and bathrooms that strike the balance between providing the safest design solutions while creating a noninstitutional environment.

  • Resiliency is a growing necessity. It is important to understand the impacts on the built environment resulting from natural and manmade disasters and disturbances and to design for those impacts now. Presented in this course is an overview of the benefits of using steel doors as part of a resilient design strategy for applications requiring resistance to blasts, tornadoes, and ballistics.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • This course provides a basic introduction to the International, Mid-Century Modern, and Ranch styles of architecture and design (and their offshoots) found in commercial and residential forms in the western United States. These styles helped shape the look of California, especially in Los Angeles and Palm Springs, from the 1920s through 1970s.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

  • Designers, building users, and managers are increasingly focused on building and occupant health as well as energy conservation. This course explores how mixed-mode (hybrid) ventilation systems address all these issues by improving the ratio of fresh air introduced into buildings while reducing energy needs and costs. It describes the benefits, elements, and workings of these systems and provides design guidance and illustrative case studies.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Railings are often one of the most important parts of a deck or stair project because of the safety and security they provide, but they can offer character, style, and beauty as well as functionality. Today's railing systems present many possibilities to create a unique design perfectly suited to the project needs. This course examines high-strength, powder-coated aluminum railings, from code considerations to installation and maintenance. It presents the versatile, mix-and-match capability of finishes, top rail styles, lighting, and infill options that offer long-lasting, easy-to-install solutions for residential and commercial applications, both indoors and out.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

  • Properly designed ventilation is a key component of a heathy roof environment and exterior building envelope. A balanced intake and exhaust system will ensure the attic space is not retaining excess moisture that could result in damage to the roof decking material, excess mold and mildew growth, ice dams causing shingle damage, algae growth, and water or mold stains on the interior ceiling and walls. Additionally, proper ventilation in the exterior building envelope can help prevent premature deterioration of the siding and roof covering materials. This course explains the fundamentals of attic and envelope ventilation and highlights the importance of a balanced system, identifies the many venting options available, and discusses various ventilation case studies.

  • Concrete is often the substrate for both new and existing floors. Transforming the surface into a finished floor is far more sustainable than consuming additional flooring materials, adhesives, and transportation-related energy to install a floor covering. This course discusses the stages and options of the concrete polishing process, recognizes benefits of recent advances in concrete densification chemistry, and provides an overview of the limitations and possibilities for concrete floor finishes.

  • Choosing a sink and countertop for kitchen and bathroom installations can be overwhelming with the array of choices in today's marketplace. To facilitate the selection process, this course provides an overview of the different sink/countertop materials, sink configurations, and installation methods that are utilized in both residential and commercial applications with a focus on seamless integration design.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

Displaying 1 - 25 of 524 results.

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