Building knowledge and connections

Continuing Education

ASHRAE. American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers - www.ashrae.org

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  • The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) applies to all state and local government agencies, commercial facilities, and public entities that have “places of public accommodation.” Presented in this course are the fundamentals of what accessibility means in terms of architectural door hardware specification. Topics include available hardware technology, the criteria for interior and perimeter access, and the codes and guidelines pertaining to the ADA requirements that affect door hardware selection.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

  • What are the macro trends and ideas directing us into the next decade? This course begins with a review of this topic, followed by discussions on movements in each area of color, and the materials, textures, design themes, and motifs that are at the forefront of today’s design trends.

  • This course is aimed at Contractors and their trades who are working on green building projects or who would like to be more involved in green buildings. This course will provide an overview of what a green building is, different ways that Contractors and their trades can get involved, and the key areas that fall under the Contractor’s responsibility when executing a LEED® project.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

     In order to download this course, a USD $50.00 fee must be paid.

  • Vacuum insulation panels (VIPs) offer higher thermal resistance per unit thickness than traditional insulation materials. This means a building envelope can meet the effective R-values for enclosures required by the energy codes without having to increase the thickness of the walls, roof, or floors. This course discusses how VIPs work, why they are effective, and the impact the properties of the materials used to construct a VIP can have on its performance. VIP installations and the latest developments in VIP technology are reviewed to illustrate the advantages of using VIPs as thermal insulation in the design of energy-efficient buildings.

  • All vapor retarders (VRs) are air barriers (ABs), but not all ABs are VRs. Wait, what? How can that be? This presentation provides the practical side to the AB/VR discussion and identifies common VRs and ABs, how they're installed, and why AB/VR approaches vary according to the type of construction and building use.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

  • An air curtain, also known as an air door, employs a controlled stream of air aimed across an opening to create an air seal. This seal separates different environments while allowing a smooth, unhindered flow of traffic and unobstructed vision through the opening. This course discusses how air curtains work and why they can contribute to occupant comfort, energy efficiency, and indoor air quality when the door is open. It also reviews how air curtains improve whole-building energy efficiency versus conventional methods.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • The world of windows is much more complex than one might suspect, given the different sizes, shapes, and types that are available and the performance requirements they must meet. As well, glass comes in many specialized forms intended for different applications. This course focuses on aluminum commercial window components and configurations, as well as the benefits they offer affecting both performance goals and design requirements. Also included are discussions on historic and acoustic applications.

  • Air control dampers are an essential component of a building’s HVAC system, regulating heating, cooling, and ventilation performance. Presented here is an introduction to control, balancing, backdraft, industrial, and multizone dampers; each type plays an important role in the HVAC system. Discussed are damper types, components, and performance metrics. Guidance is provided for damper specification, installation, and maintenance and inspection.

  • Louvers are an essential part of every HVAC system, but their selection and sizing is often misunderstood or overlooked. In this course, we’ll take a thorough look at louver components, types, options, accessories, appropriate selection, and proper sizing for a variety of climates, including wind-driven rain and hurricane areas.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

  • In the 1920s, aluminum turned the world of metals upside-down with its benefits of light weight, strength, fabrication flexibility, and durability. Since then, finishing technology has provided a steady stream of protection and coloring improvements. This course explores the sustainability of aluminum, the anodizing process, and the performance characteristics of architectural anodized aluminum. It includes information to assist in the selection and specification of architectural anodized finishes for aluminum sheet, extrusions, and panels.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Although built-up roofs are the oldest type of low-slope roofing systems, gaining an understanding of the advantages and characteristics of modified bitumen membranes will help you select the asphalt roofing system that improves performance and saves on installation costs over traditional asphalt roofs. Learn how “mod bit” roofs, whether APP or SBS, provide improved durability with stronger reinforcements, resistance to hail and traffic damage, and provide factory-controlled quality manufacturing.

  • By design, automatic pedestrian doors provide easier, more convenient access than manual doors for a wide variety of building types, and their popularity in commercial design continues to grow. Reviewed in this course are the available options of automatic door solutions, including sliding, swinging, ICC/CCU, and revolving door systems. Also discussed are the code requirements and considerations relating to automatic doors for proper specification.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

  • In this one-hour presentation, we explore how HVLS fans can contribute to LEED v4, increase thermal comfort, and provide a silent and elegant design strategy. We discuss how to save energy and improve indoor air quality for building occupants. Our team will explain how HVLS fans provide a creative design solution that effectively moves large amounts of air within occupied spaces to cool building occupants, maintain thermal comfort, and support ventilation strategies. Finally, we will review computational fluid dynamics to measure airflow performance and impact to a space and how this can contribute to LEED v4 certification.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Animals, plants, and microbes are engineers of what works and lasts on earth. Biomimicry is a practice in which nature's designs, patterns, and strategies are examined to find sustainable solutions to our technical and design problems. This course discusses how applying the concepts of biomimicry can better connect our designs and buildings with nature and examines the relationship between nature's solutions to light, heat, and glare control and today's shading design principles.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Finding ways to improve the energy efficiency of buildings is a key focus of many codes organizations, designers, architects, and government groups. This course examines how the roof of a building—one of the few parts of a building envelope that undergoes periodic replacement—impacts energy efficiency. It also explores how roof design can be a key contributor to meeting both sustainability and energy operating cost goals.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Understanding building physics is critical to proper building envelope design. Examined here are practical concepts for the building designer, including how cladding systems perform across different climate zones and applications. Environmental control layers and hygrothermal loads are reviewed, as is the concept of perfect/universal wall design. The course focuses on how single-component insulated metal panels (IMPs) function as a perfect/universal wall, simplifying wall system design and installation.

  • Thermally controlled environments such as cold storage freezers and coolers, and food processing and packaging facilities take many different forms. Their performance and functionality depend on their project-specific requirements and can be affected by the conditions the materials and systems are subjected to. This course discusses how insulated metal panels (IMPs) perform the necessary functions to provide an effective energy-efficient building envelope and why they are suitable for use within temperature-controlled hygienic environments—where performance is critical.

  • ICF construction is cost effective and sustainable, and is a superior way to build stronger, quieter, healthier, and more energy-efficient commercial structures. This course explores insulated concrete form (ICF) construction, describing the forms themselves and their construction, performance, and sustainable benefits. Also presented are design guidelines, the installation process, flooring systems, and commercial project applications.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Commercial planters add interest to both commercial and residential spaces. An understanding of materials and options available when specifying planters is an essential tool for both designers and architects. These topics are addressed in this course along with discussions on the applications of commercial planters and the benefits they offer in the design of indoor and outdoor spaces.

    Prerequisites: None

    Course Level: Introductory

  • In today’s high-performance building market, specifying materials that work together as a complete wall system is more critical than ever. Systems can help designers meet new energy codes, reduce costs, and improve building function and sustainability while making the design process faster and simpler. Focusing on the most common exterior wall system, steel stud with masonry veneer, this course details key system components, recent advances in building analysis, code requirements, and a comprehensive systems approach.

  • Composite aluminum/wood windows (not aluminum clad wood windows) combine the beauty and warmth of wood with the strength, weather resistance, and durability of finished extruded aluminum. This course explores the unique design capabilities of composite aluminum/wood windows and explains how their technical features, design elements, and hinge operating system contribute to their high structural strength, water management, and thermal performance.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Historically, traditional waterproofing methods involve the placement of a barrier or membrane between the concrete and water. Unlike membranes and other surface systems, crystalline waterproofing is designed to make the concrete itself waterproof. This course discusses how crystalline waterproofing technology provides a high level of performance to concrete structures and what design professionals need to know in order to specify and understand how this chemical technology can improve building projects, cut costs, and help earn LEED® credits.

  • Concrete-faced insulated products are composite prefinished panels that are used to construct walls and roofing assemblies to maximize the energy efficiency, durability, and performance of a building envelope. This course discusses the design criteria used in designing energy-efficient buildings using concrete-faced continuous insulation systems for low-slope roofing, walls, and foundations. The functional and physical features of protective membrane roof (PMR) systems, concrete-faced insulated panels for walls and foundations, and concrete structural insulated panels (CSIPs) are evaluated.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Universal hot water availability is generally taken for granted. At a time when energy prices and sources, environmental concerns, and water shortages are increasing in significance, it is important to produce hot water in a manner that addresses all these issues. This course explains how electric tankless water heaters (ETWHs) do this while also improving health and safety conditions and reducing costs. The examination includes detailed descriptions of many types of ETWHs and the basic calculations and selection criteria for the most suitable system.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • This course is for anyone working on a LEED project that is pursuing the Construction IAQ Management Plan – During Construction point. This course will look at how teams can work together to make sure the correct documentation is collected and that, ultimately, the plan is being implemented effectively by everyone involved. This will result in fewer questions from reviewers, less backtracking by the project team to collect documentation retroactively, and a less contaminated space for future occupants. This course is applicable to LEED 2009 as well as LEED v4, as this credit has not changed.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

     In order to download this course, a USD $50.00 fee must be paid.

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