Building knowledge and connections

Continuing Education

Category: 03 00 00 - CONCRETE

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  • Moisture infiltration through a building envelope can cause widespread damage to building elements and construction materials. In some cases, it can threaten or destroy a building’s structural integrity. The components of today’s waterproofing systems for floors and walls above- and below-grade, or plaza decks are designed to work together to provide tight, durable, and complete protection not just against water, but all other environmental contaminants. This course discusses the fundamentals of waterproofing design, the types of materials used, and the considerations for selecting a waterproofing system to meet the requirements of a building project.


  • It is an expectation that today’s buildings have to be more than just aesthetically pleasing: they have to provide measurable, environmental benefits. This course outlines how insulated concrete forms (ICFs) help meet sustainable design objectives and examines the advantages that ICFs and ICF technology have over conventional construction materials for building envelopes in all building types.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Ultrathin prestressed precast technology provides a versatile, lightweight panel that offers the strength and aesthetic versatility of concrete at a fraction of the weight. Prestressed precast panels can be used to replace a variety of traditional building materials in a wide range of exterior and interior applications. Reviewed in this course are the benefits, design and cost considerations, and the connection and fastening systems of prestressed precast panels in architectural applications.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • Segmental retaining walls (SRWs) can strengthen steep slopes, hold back soil in grade changes, create useable land, and enhance the aesthetics of any landscape. This course looks at the site and application factors that determine whether a segmental retaining wall must be engineered and soil reinforced, and provides technical information about the components and construction of an SRW.


  • Although known for being a strong and versatile building material, there are a number of factors that affect the sustainability of concrete, and a variety of measures that can be taken to increase its durability and extend its service life. This course discusses the environmental impact of concrete and some of the main causes of concrete deterioration, and examines how crystalline waterproofing technology can be employed to increase the durability and sustainability of concrete.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • The green building movement is gaining momentum worldwide, resulting in stricter regulations regarding the energy efficiency of structures. Conventional construction methods can't always meet these demands and more innovative and thermally efficient building products are required. This course focuses specifically on thermal bridging, how it affects the overall efficiency of a building, and how it can be effectively addressed.

    Prerequisites:No

    Course Level:Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Light-manipulating materials use internal channels to capture, bend, scatter, and redirect light and create visually stunning spaces. Panels and slabs in resin, glass, and terrazzo create an experiential surface for privacy screens or signage, primary or accent lighting, countertops or flooring—anywhere the interplay of light and shadow is desired for beauty and inspiration. This course describes the different types of light-manipulating materials and substrates as well as the design and installation options for a wide range of dynamic, unique applications.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Driven largely by public interest in minimizing the potential environmental impact of building products, architects and builders actively embrace “green” initiatives and are calling for building product transparency. The Environmental Product Declaration (EPD) was developed to address this need. This course examines the EPD and includes discussions on who wants EPDs and why, the EPD development process, the contents of an EPD, and the future of EPDs.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Permeable interlocking concrete pavement (PICP) has the ability to create solid, strong surfaces for pedestrians and a range of vehicular uses, and can help maintain a site’s existing natural hydrologic function and reduce the overall impact of development. This course discusses the components of a PICP system and how they work together to manage stormwater in a variety of applications. Also addressed are hydrological and structural factors to consider when designing with PICP, and how PICP contributes to sustainable building goals and projects.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • There is a growing realization that the buildings we live and work in play an important role in the health and wellbeing of building occupants. Green building rating systems are starting to incorporate health and wellbeing criteria and this course will look specifically at how products and materials can help meet the health and wellbeing requirements across these systems.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • As some of the earliest building materials, masonry and concrete have been used for their durability and strength. However, masonry architecture, both historical and contemporary, has been left vulnerable to water—the single most damaging element to masonry in our environment. This course identifies common water-related problems for masonry and concrete, describes protective treatments that increase masonry durability, and explains the process for safely selecting and applying a protective treatment.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • Critical to concrete waterproofing are the products used in combination to create a system that ensures complete control of moisture migration. Presented here are effective concrete waterproofing technologies and how they improve the durability and lifespan of structures. Discussions include water penetration, system selection, membrane protection, and cementitious waterproofing.


  • Proper building envelope design, component detailing, and wall system performance are critical in a durable, energy efficient building. One of the key aspects of achieving a highly efficient and durable building is the ability to protect the building from unwanted air and water infiltration. This course reviews the necessity and benefits of air, vapor, and moisture barriers, how moisture makes its way into the building envelope, the negative impact it can have on the structure, and different design options to control air leakage and moisture movement to ensure a high performance building.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Ensuring proper use of methods and materials allows masonry walls to perform well and enjoy a long life. Use of masonry joint reinforcement and accessories is an essential part of this. This course provides a brief history of solid masonry walls leading up to the modern cavity walls of today, including a discussion of the basic working knowledge of masonry joint reinforcing, structural codes, and moisture control in cavity wall construction.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • One of the more complicated issues today in building science is addressing moisture movement, since moisture can penetrate a building in several different ways and result in material degradation, mold, and air quality issues. By knowing and understanding the source of the water and its movement, effective solutions can be developed to eliminate or retard moisture movement. This course focuses on moisture movement below grade and the methods used to prevent and control the different types of moisture movement to provide complete below-slab protection. Industry codes and standards that must be met when specifying vapor retarders/barriers are also discussed.


  • When designing a steel mesh fence, there are three steel mesh options to consider: chain link fabric, expanded metal, and welded wire mesh. Although mesh choice may be the primary focus when designing fence, an understanding of the application and material specifications should be key considerations as well. This course provides a review of the material specifications, installation, and standards related to the design of steel mesh fence systems.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • Stairs are a primary means of egress, exit, and floor-to-floor access for buildings with multiple floors or a change in rise. Metal stair systems designed for commercial and industrial applications can be fabricated out of steel, stainless steel, cast iron, and aluminum. This course evaluates types of pre-engineered steel stair systems and includes discussions on advantages, class, fabricator vs. manufacturer, railings, stair flight and landing construction, connections, and building code requirements.


  • The inherent properties of concrete masonry, including strength, durability, and fire safety, have been well documented, though a perception of high cost persists. However, due to significant changes to codes and standards that have increased the flexibility of concrete masonry systems, these systems offer cost-effective solutions. This course reviews changes to ASTM C90 and the masonry design standard and includes a discussion on the benefits and opportunities these new requirements bring.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Basic


  • This course explains and illustrates how high-performance, fully composite insulated sandwich wall panels can be detailed to achieve continuous insulation. It explores the pros, cons, and attributes of wythe connectors such as carbon fiber trusses as well as panel insulation options, manufacturing and testing procedures, and installation methods. It concludes by providing a comprehensive set of sample installations to illustrate the broad range of building types and appearances that can be created with insulated sandwich wall systems.

    Prerequisites:No

    Course Level:Introductory


  • Quartz surfacing is a man-made material consisting of up to 93% natural quartz crystal. In this course, you will discover the other components behind the beauty, durability, and flexibility of this surfacing material. You will see the composition, production, and quality assurance processes that go into making the material and the resultant attributes and capabilities, as well as the installation basics of quartz surfacing materials.


  • Since ancient times, concrete mixes and carved natural stone have combined to create substance, beauty, and longevity in our architecture. Glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) was created to ensure that the attributes of concrete and stone continue to be enjoyed but with the efficiency in application that is expected in today’s world of design. This course covers the evolution of GFRC, its applications and how it is custom-created, its advantages, and how GFRC compares to other types of architectural concrete.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • Concrete is the most widely used construction material in the world, second only to water. Over time, as a result of the build-up of atmospheric compounds in the surrounding environment, concrete will become discolored, stained, dirty and dingy. This course examines photocatalytic technology which accelerates self-cleaning and fights air pollution while maintaining the mechanical and physical properties of traditional concrete.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Building systems can be enhanced by incorporating reflective insulation or radiant barriers into the building envelope. With effective insulation, heat transfer is reduced, resulting in less summer heat gain, and less winter heat loss. This course explains common and effective uses for reflective insulation and radiant barriers in a wide range of construction and building applications and demonstrates how these systems reduce energy usage, increase the lifespan of the mechanical equipment for heating and cooling, and reduce maintenance requirements and frequency of replacement.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Water intrusion creates a variety of problems for masonry structures, including freeze-thaw damage, chemical- and pollution-based attacks, efflorescence, calcium carbonate stains, and mold. This course reviews the application and specification considerations related to water repellents and how they can help to prevent these problems.


  • High-performance buildings require envelopes with thermal, air, and vapor layers that are typically installed individually and by separate contractors, adding to the complexity of their construction. Integrally-insulated concrete tilt-up panels provide multiple building envelope layers in one element. In this course we’ll look at these insulated concrete walls, the types, their components, their thermal and moisture resistant properties, and where they are used.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

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