Building knowledge and connections

Continuing Education

Category: 03 00 00 - CONCRETE

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  • A naturally occurring radioactive gas, radon is a silent danger to our health. Colorless and odorless, it enters homes and structures through openings in the foundation and below-grade walls, becoming trapped in basements and other poorly ventilated areas. This course looks at methods of controlling radon, how it is addressed in building codes, the advantages of closed-cell spray polyurethane foam (ccSPF) over other insulation materials, and proper installation techniques.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • Interlocking concrete pavements are appropriate for any application that requires paving, and durable, creative interlock begins with clear and technically accurate specifications. This presentation moves through every section of ICPI Tech Spec 9: Guide Specification for the Construction of Interlocking Concrete Pavement to show how quality assurance is achieved through specifications.


  • There is a growing realization that the buildings we live and work in play an important role in the health and wellbeing of building occupants. Green building rating systems are starting to incorporate health and wellbeing criteria and this course will look specifically at how products and materials can help meet the health and wellbeing requirements across these systems.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • The materials we use have a significant impact on the environment, our communities, and our health. Consequently, material transparency—wherein manufacturers disclose vital sustainability information about their products—is an increasingly necessary element of modern life. This course examines the tools and resources that are available for both manufacturers and the A&D community that effectively communicate transparency information and optimization of building products. Also reviewed are the benefits of the new-generation insulated metal panels (IMPs) designed to achieve a trusted range of health and wellness certifications.

    Prerequisites: None

    Course Level: Introductory


  • Increased energy efficiency in both new and existing construction continues to play a large factor behind the design decisions we make and the materials we choose to integrate into our buildings. Concrete masonry construction can provide a wide range of benefits. This course illustrates how building envelopes constructed with concrete masonry create high-performance buildings that can exceed energy code requirements.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • There are many steps required to ensure a well thought out and complete construction project. This course examines procedures for inspection of interlocking concrete pavement, or ICP. It addresses preconstruction meeting details, requirements for submittals, and site inspection points from project start to completion. Various testing methods and inspection criteria are presented as well, and the importance of having an ICPI-trained contractor on the jobsite is discussed.


  • Water intrusion creates a variety of problems for masonry structures, including freeze-thaw damage, chemical- and pollution-based attacks, efflorescence, calcium carbonate stains, and mold. This course reviews the application and specification considerations related to water repellents and how they can help to prevent these problems.


  • In order to address tile installation difficulties effectively and avoid failures, designers and specifiers must maintain full awareness of current knowledge, practices, and products. This course reviews potentially problematic contemporary tile installation issues along with the industry guidance, methodologies, and products available to address them.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • Moisture and soil gas beneath concrete slabs can cause a myriad of problems in both residential and commercial applications. The causes and consequences of these problems are reviewed in this course, along with a discussion on the types and characteristics of under-slab water vapor and soil gas barriers.


  • In today’s high-performance building market, specifying materials that work together as a complete wall system is more critical than ever. Systems can help designers meet new energy codes, reduce costs, and improve building function and sustainability while making the design process faster and simpler. Focusing on the most common exterior wall system, steel stud with masonry veneer, this course details key system components, recent advances in building analysis, code requirements, and a comprehensive systems approach.


  • The green building movement is gaining momentum worldwide, resulting in stricter regulations regarding the energy efficiency of structures. Conventional construction methods can't always meet these demands and more innovative and thermally efficient building products are required. This course focuses specifically on thermal bridging, how it affects the overall efficiency of a building, and how it can be effectively addressed.

    Prerequisites:No

    Course Level:Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Concrete-faced insulated products are composite prefinished panels that are used to construct walls and roofing assemblies to maximize the energy efficiency, durability, and performance of a building envelope. This course discusses the design criteria used in designing energy-efficient buildings using concrete-faced continuous insulation systems for low-slope roofing, walls, and foundations. The functional and physical features of protective membrane roof (PMR) systems, concrete-faced insulated panels for walls and foundations, and concrete structural insulated panels (CSIPs) are evaluated.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Learners will receive information about cast stone and how it is made, testing requirements, applications, design recommendations and how it differs from related materials. Learners will describe appropriate specification, design details of cast stone for architectural applications and how to determine quality cast stone production.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • Concrete is often the substrate for both new and existing floors. Transforming the surface into a finished floor is far more sustainable than consuming additional flooring materials, adhesives, and transportation-related energy to install a floor covering. This course discusses the stages and options of the concrete polishing process, recognizes benefits of recent advances in concrete densification chemistry, and provides an overview of the limitations and possibilities for concrete floor finishes.


  • Insulating concrete form (ICF) products use a cost-effective and robust structural material option (reinforced concrete) to turn a building envelope into a high performing thermal, moisture, and air enclosure, with disaster resistance and built-in compliance with energy code requirements. As a result of their performance, building owners can complete a whole structure with ICFs and reinforced concrete, including intermediate suspended floors, roof tops, and multi-story designs. This course examines the advancements in ICF technology and discusses the potential contribution held by ICFs to support improved sustainability and resilience.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Moisture infiltration through a building envelope can cause widespread damage to building elements and construction materials. In some cases, it can threaten or destroy a building’s structural integrity. The components of today’s waterproofing systems for above- and below-grade floors and walls or plaza decks are designed to work together to provide tight, durable, and complete protection against not just water but also all other environmental contaminants. This course discusses the fundamentals of waterproofing design, the types of materials used, and the considerations for selecting a waterproofing system to meet the requirements of a building project.


  • Driven largely by public interest in minimizing the potential environmental impact of building products, architects and builders actively embrace “green” initiatives and are calling for building product transparency. The Environmental Product Declaration (EPD) was developed to address this need. This course examines the EPD and includes discussions on who wants EPDs and why, the EPD development process, the contents of an EPD, and the future of EPDs.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Although known for being a strong and versatile building material, there are a number of factors that affect the sustainability of concrete, and a variety of measures that can be taken to increase its durability and extend its service life, thus protecting the health, safety, and welfare of the users. This course discusses the environmental impact of concrete and some of the main causes of concrete deterioration, and examines how crystalline waterproofing technology can be employed to increase the durability and sustainability of concrete.

    Prerequisites:No

    Course Level:Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Floor finishes are one of the last items to be installed prior to substantial completion. Indoor environmental quality concerns related to adhesives make most project 09 flooring specifications require moisture testing before flooring can be installed on concrete slabs. When those moisture tests fail the project faces burdensome time delays and unexpected costs. This course explores concrete moisture and applied flooring, as well as several misconceptions regarding moisture testing. It provides guidance on eliminating concrete moisture problems while protecting the owner, design team, and building occupants from project delivery delays, cost overruns, future failed flooring, poor environmental conditions, and litigation.


  • ICF construction is cost effective and sustainable, and is a superior way to build stronger, quieter, healthier, and more energy-efficient commercial structures. This course explores insulated concrete form (ICF) construction, describing the forms themselves and their construction, performance, and sustainable benefits. Also presented are design guidelines, the installation process, flooring systems, and commercial project applications.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Floor coating systems are designed to protect surfaces in many different service environments. A coating's ability to increase durability, mitigate abrasion, and utilize antislip properties to improve occupant safety is critical in today's building climate. This course reviews coating system basics, including surface preparation and proper installation techniques. Selection criteria for floor coating systems in various applications are also discussed.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • This recorded webinar is the third of five sessions presented during the Building Science Master Summit held by DuPont Performance Building Solutions. This course dives into the topic of below-grade thermal performance and how to appropriately design for the long term. It explores heat loss patterns; energy code requirements and how they differ by region and building type; insulating best practices and benefits; and considerations for material selection.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Natural fibers have been used for over 2,000 years as a method to strengthen building materials. Cellulose fiber provides an excellent alternative to traditional secondary reinforcement, reducing plastic shrinkage cracks and improving durability, impact resistance, shatter resistance, and freeze/thaw resistance without compromising the appearance or finishability of a concrete surface. This course covers the evolution of fiber, its benefits, and why it is a sustainable material.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Historically, traditional waterproofing methods involve the placement of a barrier or membrane between the concrete and water. Unlike membranes and other surface systems, crystalline waterproofing is designed to make the concrete itself waterproof. This course discusses how crystalline waterproofing technology provides a high level of performance to concrete structures and what design professionals need to know in order to specify and understand how this chemical technology can improve building projects, cut costs, and help earn LEED® credits.


  • Typically specified for pavements because of its strength, durability, and life-cycle value, concrete is increasingly being specified for a variety of exterior and interior projects because of its aesthetic potential. This course explores colored concrete including coloring methods, pigments, color consistency, and maintenance. It examines the specification considerations of cast-in-place and precast concrete and looks at a range of interior applications and concrete finishes.

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