Building knowledge and connections

Continuing Education

Category: 03 00 00 - CONCRETE

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  • This course explains and illustrates how high-performance, fully composite insulated sandwich wall panels can be detailed to achieve continuous insulation. It explores the pros, cons, and attributes of wythe connectors such as carbon fiber trusses as well as panel insulation options, manufacturing and testing procedures, and installation methods. It concludes by providing a comprehensive set of sample installations to illustrate the broad range of building types and appearances that can be created with insulated sandwich wall systems.


  • Mortars are utilized to bind masonry units together and fill the gaps between them. Understanding the critical relationship between bricks and mortar is fundamental to a successful installation. This course covers the performance and specification considerations related to the different types of mortar used for masonry construction, including portland/lime mixes, mortar cement and masonry cement.


  • There are many steps required to ensure a well thought out and complete construction project. This course examines procedures for inspection of permeable interlocking concrete pavement or PICP. It addresses preconstruction meeting details, requirements for submittals, and site inspection points from project start to completion. Various testing methods and inspection criteria are presented as well, and the importance of having an ICPI-trained contractor on the job site is discussed.


  • Light-manipulating materials use internal channels to capture, bend, scatter, and redirect light and create visually stunning spaces. Panels and slabs in resin, glass, and terrazzo create an experiential surface for privacy screens or signage, primary or accent lighting, countertops or flooring—anywhere the interplay of light and shadow is desired for beauty and inspiration. This course describes the different types of light-manipulating materials and substrates as well as the design and installation options for a wide range of dynamic, unique applications.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Stormwater management is a critical component in any municipality to retain and infiltrate increased runoff volumes and flow rates from developed land that creates increased impervious cover (roofs and pavements). The course discusses the hydrologic and structural design fundamentals of permeable interlocking concrete pavement (PICP) and why it is an excellent choice to help meet stormwater management goals. Discussions include the benefits of using PICP, components of PICP, design and construction considerations and how use of PICP can help earn LEED® credits.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Ensuring proper use of methods and materials allows masonry walls to perform well and enjoy a long life. Use of masonry joint reinforcement and accessories is an essential part of this. This course provides a brief history of solid masonry walls leading up to the modern cavity walls of today, including a discussion of the basic working knowledge of masonry joint reinforcing, structural codes, and moisture control in cavity wall construction.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • When designing a steel mesh fence, there are three steel mesh options to consider: chain link fabric, expanded metal, and welded wire mesh. Although mesh choice may be the primary focus when designing fence, an understanding of the application and material specifications should be key considerations as well. This course provides a review of the material specifications, installation, and standards related to the design of steel mesh fence systems.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • Concrete is the most widely used construction material in the world, second only to water. Over time, as a result of the build-up of atmospheric compounds in the surrounding environment, concrete will become discolored, stained, dirty and dingy. This course examines photocatalytic technology which accelerates self-cleaning and fights air pollution while maintaining the mechanical and physical properties of traditional concrete.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Concrete is one of the most widely used building materials throughout the world, and as such, it is in everyone’s best interest to consider more sustainable options. This course provides an overview of the properties of slag cement. Discussion topics include benefits, effects on plastics and hardened concrete, environmental profile including life cycle analysis (LCA) and environmental product declarations (EPDs), and various slag cement applications.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • Insulating concrete forms (ICFs) combine the strength and durability of reinforced concrete with rigid insulation, and they provide ideal solutions for apartments, condos, hotels, dormitories, and assisted living facilities. This course provides guidance for architects and engineers on how to design and build high-performance, reinforced concrete, multifamily residential buildings using ICFs. With increased attention to occupant safety and comfort, design professionals can take advantage of concrete’s inherent fire resistance and noise reduction qualities.


  • Ultra-thin prestressed precast technology provides a versatile, lightweight panel that offers the strength and aesthetic versatility of concrete at a fraction of the weight. Reviewed in this course are the benefits, design and cost considerations, and the connection and fastening systems of prestressed precast panels in architectural applications.


  • Historically, traditional waterproofing methods involve the placement of a barrier or membrane between the concrete and water. Unlike membranes and other surface systems, crystalline waterproofing is designed to make the concrete itself waterproof. This course discusses how crystalline waterproofing technology provides a high level of performance to concrete structures and what design professionals need to know in order to specify and understand how this chemical technology can improve building projects, cut costs, and help earn LEED® credits.


  • The high pH levels (alkalinity) inherent in healthy concrete slabs can pose a serious threat to the long-term performance of adhesives and construction coatings specified in floor, deck, and roof assembly projects. This course discusses how to manage risk by crafting tight, nonambiguous performance specifications based on ASTM F3010 to control both concrete moisture vapor and concrete alkalinity. This will help ensure that the proper above-slab barrier products are selected, bid, and installed and that the project delivers long-term performance.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • There are many important considerations and issues related to outdoor tile and stone surfacing installations. This course provides an overview of the causes of their frequent failures, a detailed description of a system which addresses those issues and avoids the failures, and case studies of successful system installations in various contexts.


  • Stairs are a primary means of egress, exit, and floor-to-floor access for buildings with multiple floors or a change in rise. Metal stair systems designed for commercial and industrial applications can be fabricated out of steel, stainless steel, cast iron, and aluminum. This course evaluates types of pre-engineered steel stair systems and includes discussions on advantages, class, fabricator vs. manufacturer, railings, stair flight and landing construction, connections, and building code requirements.


  • Insulating concrete form (ICF) products use a cost-effective and robust structural material option (reinforced concrete) to turn a building envelope into a high performing thermal, moisture, and air enclosure, with disaster resistance and built-in compliance with energy code requirements. As a result of their performance, building owners can complete a whole structure with ICFs and reinforced concrete, including intermediate suspended floors, roof tops, and multi-story designs. This course examines the advancements in ICF technology and discusses the potential contribution held by ICFs to support improved sustainability and resilience.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Interlocking concrete pavements are appropriate for any application that requires paving, and durable, creative interlock begins with clear and technically accurate specifications. This presentation moves through every section of ICPI Tech Spec 9: Guide Specification for the Construction of Interlocking Concrete Pavement to show how quality assurance is achieved through specifications.


  • The construction of residential and commercial buildings that use less energy to operate and are long lived is a key part of sustainable design. Insulated concrete forms (ICFs) provide the necessary U-factor, airtightness, resiliency, and durability for all building types. Insulated concrete forms in residential and commercial construction projects offer excellent thermal performance and reduced energy consumption and operating costs, while maintaining a very comfortable and healthy interior environment. This course examines the ICF wall, including materials and components, and discusses design considerations and construction.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • There are many steps required to ensure a well thought out and complete construction project. This course examines procedures for inspection of interlocking concrete pavement, or ICP. It addresses preconstruction meeting details, requirements for submittals, and site inspection points from project start to completion. Various testing methods and inspection criteria are presented as well, and the importance of having an ICPI-trained contractor on the jobsite is discussed.


  • Over the past several decades, there has been a continuous increase in human and economic loss from disaster events. The rise in disasters and their consequences is related to a rise in people's vulnerability, induced by human development. However, examples of resiliency planning and more stringent building code requirements still lag. This course offers a view on emerging risks and opportunities as human and economic losses from disasters increase, with the overarching goal of supporting and advancing resilience in future construction of buildings and critical infrastructure.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • Falls are responsible for more open wounds, fractures, and brain injuries than any other cause of injury. Photoluminescent (PL) exit path markers have proven to provide safe and quick egress in all light conditions for occupants and fail-safe guidance to first responders entering unfamiliar surroundings in the event of an emergency. This course discusses the benefits of PL safety products and the codes and testing standards related to PL way-finding systems.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Concrete is a popular, versatile, and durable construction material, and it has the potential to be very beautiful as well. Graphically imaged precast concrete is a creative, inspiring technology that can be used by architects and designers to create visually impactful building façades and other concrete surfaces. Discussed are the fabrication process, design possibilities, and budgeting considerations. Global case studies present a range of applications of both stock and unique designs.


  • Typically specified for pavements because of its strength, durability, and life-cycle value, concrete is increasingly being specified for a variety of exterior and interior projects because of its aesthetic potential. This course explores colored concrete including coloring methods, pigments, color consistency, and maintenance. It examines the specification considerations of cast-in-place and precast concrete and looks at a range of interior applications and concrete finishes.


  • Since ancient times, concrete mixes and carved natural stone have combined to create substance, beauty, and longevity in our architecture. Glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) was created to ensure that the attributes of concrete and stone continue to be enjoyed but with the efficiency in application that is expected in today’s world of design. This course covers the evolution of GFRC, its applications and how it is custom-created, its advantages, and how GFRC compares to other types of architectural concrete.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • In order to address tile installation difficulties effectively and avoid failures, designers and specifiers must maintain full awareness of current knowledge, practices, and products. This course reviews potentially problematic contemporary tile installation issues along with the industry guidance, methodologies, and products available to address them.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

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