Building knowledge and connections

Continuing Education

Category: 12 00 00 - FURNISHINGS

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  • Driven largely by public interest in minimizing the potential environmental impact of building products, architects and builders actively embrace “green” initiatives and are calling for building product transparency. The Environmental Product Declaration (EPD) was developed to address this need. This course examines the EPD and includes discussions on who wants EPDs and why, the EPD development process, the contents of an EPD, and the future of EPDs.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.


  • While the bathroom was once a strictly utilitarian space, a growing trend among luxury consumers is to create a custom, spa-like retreat right in the home. Surveys find that luxury consumers value functional and design excellence, uniqueness that reflects a creative side, and exceptional quality and value. This course examines the shower products available that help to create a personalized, multi-sensory experience with beautifully designed pieces that meet water efficiency standards.


  • Thermally fused laminate (TFL), formerly known as thermally fused melamine (TFM) or low-pressure laminate (LPL), is a decorative surfacing material used in cabinetry, countertops, shelving, store fixtures, moldings, and furniture in commercial and residential applications. This course explores the history of the surface treatment, its manufacture and sustainability, end-use considerations, compatibility with other decorative surfaces, and innovative design options.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.


  • Commercial building interiors see all kinds of wear and tear on a daily basis. Various forms of wall protection can combat this wear and tear to help extend the longevity of a space, maintain a clean look, and cut down on maintenance costs. This course discusses the different wall protection products available, how to identify which wall protection products fit certain applications, and which building codes apply to these products.


  • Understanding a product’s life cycle impact is central to the selection of materials for any green building. High pressure decorative laminate (HPDL) manufacturers have initiatives in place to reduce waste, energy and virgin materials in its production. This course introduces HPDL, its performance characteristics, fabrication techniques, and manufacturing processes and the processes and ingredients that make it a sustainable decorative surfacing solution for commercial and residential applications.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.


  • Audio-Visual (AV) systems and interactive experiences can be complex. To properly integrate an AV system within a building or other venue, and make it completely accessible, a practicing AV consultant should be part of the design team from early on in the project. Addressed in this course are: traditional and modern AV systems, their costs, installation, and suitable applications; proper equipment storage, cooling, and maintenance access; and designing to meet ADA requirements.


  • While the kitchen has long been considered the heart of the home, the bathroom is often thought of as a utilitarian space. However, by drawing inspiration from kitchen design principles, designers can create a bathroom that’s personalized, organized, and highly functional. Beyond serving basic needs, the bathroom is a space for relaxing, recharging, and preparing for the day ahead. This course discusses strategies for incorporating organization, ergonomics, personalization, and technology to create a streamlined styling space.


  • Cleaning is one of the higher continuous operational expenses faced by commercial building owners. Incorporating an entrance flooring system will reduce cleaning costs, improve safety and provide an environmental benefit to the building users. This course reviews entrance flooring system design considerations including code, environmental, safety and aesthetic considerations for high-traffic entrances.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.


  • Authentic sustainability requires a long-term approach to reducing impact on the environment and minimizing operational costs for building owners. This course addresses how to use this approach in restroom design by specifying products that save money, time, and resources, including those that reduce waste and usage of consumables, energy, and water. Guidance is provided on how to communicate to clients the full, long-term value of products that are aesthetically pleasing, sustainable, and easy to maintain so that the original design vision is more likely to endure.

    Prerequisites:No

    Course Level:Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.


  • Provides an overview of the history of solid surface as a decorative material with a discussion on product characteristics and attributes, and a comparison of sustainability factors of three hard surface materials and their environmental impact.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.


  • Manufacturing companies are seeing an increased demand for product transparency. This course discusses what sustainability and Design for Environment are, how transparency documents are created, how they contribute to green building certification, and how investing in sustainability can produce process and operational efficiencies that benefit people, planet, and business.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.


  • Kiln-fired glass is a fine art form with many architectural and interior design applications. This course will explain how kiln-fired glass is produced, what the range of applications are, and how installations can meet architectural glass performance and safety requirements.


  • The design of health care facilities has become increasingly relevant as health care has moved away from doctors treating illnesses to a more collaborative approach aimed at holistic well-being. The waiting room sets the stage for the doctor’s visit: it can put patients in a bad mood or it can uplift their spirits, educate their minds, and provide a sense of connectivity. Utilizing a real-world case study, this course explores the role of research-based generative design to create waiting rooms that are as much a tool as the doctor’s stethoscope in putting patients on a path to wellness.


  • Surface design and color impacts people in one way or another. Why do some surroundings induce a sense of calm, happiness, or inspiration while others offer nothing but distraction, discomfort, chaos, doom, and gloom? Interior surfaces are the point of contact between users and their environment, as well as an important connection between the visual world and physical world. This course will examine the integral role that surface color and design plays in interior spaces. Key requirements in the selection and specification process will also be discussed.


  • The design of behavioral healthcare facilities should address the therapeutic and safety needs of patients and staff while meeting the applicable codes and regulations. Reviewed in this course are ligature-resistant products developed for patient rooms and bathrooms that strike the balance between providing the safest design solutions while creating a noninstitutional environment.


  • Due to advancements in architectural decorative glass technology, the number of design options available to help designers and architects achieve the specific aesthetics and performance requirements they desire has dramatically increased. This course provides a review of architectural decorative glass including product options, applications, features, and specification considerations. Also discussed is how decorative glass can contribute to sustainable design and LEED® initiatives.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.


  • Daylight is an essential part of our health and well-being, but it needs management. Shading strives to maximize daylight without compromising building occupant comfort and well-being. This course explores the role daylight has within the built environment and its impact on occupants and energy usage, with a focus on how to better specify shadecloth based on factors such as project type, solar optical properties, shadecloth composition, and environmental factors.


  • The office furniture industry is an ever-changing marketplace and this changeability has produced huge amounts of unwanted furniture. Remanufacturing addresses the waste, cost , and storage that comes with replacing office furniture. This course looks at trends in the office furniture industry, the environmental impacts created by legacy furniture, and a review of the environmental and economic benefits of remanufactured furniture as an alternative to scrapping, downcycling, or discarding to landfill.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.


  • The cleanliness of rooms in healthcare facilities is critical in preventing patients from contracting life-threatening infections. Along with proper hand hygiene, frequent privacy or cubicle curtain changes help prevent the spread of healthcare associated infections (HAIs). This course examines the social, economic, and operational impact HAIs have on a healthcare organization and explains why removable curtain systems make it easier to keep privacy curtains clear of dangerous pathogens and protect the physical health of the building users.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.


  • Food and wine preservation refers to the process of storing products under ideal conditions in order to maximize longevity. Preserving food and wine maximizes its shelf life and flavor which, in turn, enhances the enjoyment of its consumption. Additionally, proper preservation results in less waste and saves the consumer money. This course reviews the causes of premature food deterioration, the optimal conditions for storing wine and food, and the solutions that are available with a focus on modern refrigeration units.

    Prerequisites:No

    Course Level:Introductory


  • Moss is the oldest plant on earth. A living, self-contained moss wall comprises 100% live moss plants that have an innate ability to cleanse the air while enhancing the visual aspects of an interior environment. This course discusses the impact living plant walls can have on the interior environment, explores the attributes of moss plants, and explains how live moss walls may be used to incorporate biophilia into interior spaces.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level:Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.


  • The cleanliness of a hotel guestroom bathroom directly impacts a hotel’s profitability, by its influence on customer satisfaction and hotel image. Designers should not only consider aesthetics but also the selection of finishes and fixtures that allow for faster, more cost effective sanitation. This course examines the role of clean hotel bathrooms in hotel profitability, customer satisfaction, and public health. Potential modes and threats of infection are discussed and strategies suggested for selecting fixtures that improve sanitation and minimize labor.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.


  • From classrooms to boardrooms to living rooms, hanging display systems enhance spaces and provide design freedom. This course examines wall hanging systems with a focus on integrating systems in the overall design of a project and includes discussions on system elements, selection criteria, specialty applications, and sustainable design.


  • Wood is the only carbon-negative, sustainable building product there is. Using more wood and wood-based products for interior and exterior applications can help to lower carbon emissions and combat climate change. This course discusses the benefits of using wood, identifies what sustainable hardwood species are the most abundant and where some of the best managed, certified hardwood forests are located, and compares the physical and performance properties of European beech to eight other temperate hardwoods.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.


  • The commercial space design trend toward open plans has had a major impact on interior electrical and digital infrastructure. Offices, hotels, retail spaces, and transit areas all utilize open spaces, each with their own specific issues and requirements. This course provides designers with the information required to provide code-compliant, user-friendly, and convenient power, data/communication, and AV access for a wide variety of spaces and end users, including facility managers, cleaning staff, and visitors.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

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