Continuing Education

GBCI Information

The "GBCI CE" mark indicates that the course, as described in the application and materials submitted by the provider to USGBC, holds a General CE designation and meets the General CE conditions set out in the USGBC Education Partner Program course guidelines.

Displaying 1 - 25 of 201 results.

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  • Today—as climate change, population growth, and record droughts present an unprecedented strain on our water supply—conservation technology is building awareness to the importance of having the most water efficient fixtures in a home or business. This course recognizes the flush toilet as one of the biggest users of water and discusses how toilet design is pushing flush technology to develop ways for homes and commercial buildings to conserve water without sacrificing the performance of the toilet. Industry testing protocols and the water-saving capabilities of different technologies are evaluated.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • Main entrance air curtains are used by architects and engineers in commercial, institutional, and industrial settings to both improve energy efficiency and protect occupant comfort and well-being. This course reviews the research that led to air curtains being approved as an alternative to vestibules in ASHRAE 90.1-2019 and other building codes, as well as how air curtains on main entries contribute to sustainability goals around energy conservation, public health, and indoor air quality.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • The Internet of Things (IoT) connects buildings by providing real-time data for action and evaluative purposes. Plumbing products can be part of the connected building to reduce maintenance and costs, help conserve water, and provide extra health and safety benefits not achievable with nonconnected plumbing products. This course reviews some examples of the data that can be collected from commercial plumbing products to deliver critical information to building managers and owners. It also describes how these products create cost and time savings, enhance health, safety, and compliance, and contribute to overall occupant satisfaction and wellness.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • (Canadian Version) Around the globe, companies and manufacturers are embracing socially responsible design, construction, and the development of sustainable products. This course provides an overview of sustainable design and the creation of healthier environments in reference to architectural paints. Included are discussions regarding the components of paint, independent testing methods and standards, categories of LEED®, and specification of paint systems for today’s designer.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • Growing US cities face escalating housing costs, residential and commercial displacement, homelessness, and the suburbanization of poverty. As increasing numbers of households are pushed out of the city by rising housing costs, they are burdened with long commutes and increased transportation costs while their carbon emissions escalate. These challenges are exacerbated by a deeply embedded policy—single-family zoning—that accounts for 75% or more of the land area allotted for housing in many fast-growing US cities. In this first of a two-part series, the history, evolution, and social equity and environmental impacts of single-family zoning policy in one city, Seattle, serve as an example of conditions in a number of fast-growing cities around the country. It also outlines the aggressive resistance to change and strategies architects can employ to address this. Each part of Right to the City can be taken as an individual course.

    Want free access to this and other NCARB courses? The NCARB Continuum Education Program offers free HSW CE courses to licensure candidates and architects who hold a current NCARB Certificate, which can be accessed through their NCARB record. Renew your NCARB Certificate, or get NCARB Certified.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

     In order to download this course, a USD $25.00 fee must be paid.

  • Concrete-faced insulated products are composite prefinished panels that are used to construct walls and roofing assemblies to maximize the energy efficiency, durability, and performance of a building envelope. This course discusses the design criteria used in designing energy-efficient buildings using concrete-faced continuous insulation systems for low-slope roofing, walls, and foundations. The functional and physical features of protective membrane roof (PMR) systems, concrete-faced insulated panels for walls and foundations, and concrete structural insulated panels (CSIPs) are evaluated.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • Natural light is important in everyday life, with positive effects on one's health, well-being, and productivity. This course provides an understanding of how automated high-performance shades can provide more natural light. Current market drivers and their effects on a building's value are also discussed. The course explores how to increase visual and thermal comfort by automating the balance of natural and artificial light and outlines the role of high-performance shades in meeting sustainability standards. This course also discusses the influence of automated façades on a building’s performance.

  • There are several key elements that must be considered with a cavity wall system. Heat, air, and moisture — both vapor and liquid — have a definite impact on how a cavity wall system should be designed and constructed. Once these elements have been addressed, a cavity wall system will increase energy efficiency, meet the required energy and fire code standards, and will provide cost-savings over the life of the building.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • Finding ways to improve the energy efficiency of buildings is a key focus of many codes organizations, designers, architects, and government groups. This course examines how the roof of a building—one of the few parts of a building envelope that undergoes periodic replacement—impacts energy efficiency. It also explores how roof design can be a key contributor to meeting both sustainability and energy operating cost goals.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • “Sustainable” design isn’t just “environmental.” It’s design that works for and contributes to the health and welfare of all individuals as well as the planet, now and in the future. This course looks at hand dryers as part of sustainably designed restrooms and discusses how air knife hand dryers benefit the environment through energy efficiency, resource conservation, and waste reduction, and benefit all members of society by meeting ADA requirements and Universal Design principles.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • Anybody who has worked on a green building project knows that a large portion of the project’s success lies in how well the project building is built. And success may be attaining a certain LEED® certification level, attaining certain LEED points, keeping the project on budget, implementing innovative strategies for occupants, or any number of other success metrics. Many project teams put so much emphasis into the project design and often overlook how the contractor influences the project outcome. Whether it’s managing the materials and products used on-site, planning and implementing proper indoor air quality management strategies, or just overall effective project execution, the contractor has the ability to make or break a green building project. This requires the contractor and their trades to be knowledgeable about sustainability and the green building project they’re working on.

    This course is aimed at contractors and their trades who are working on green building projects or who would like to be more involved in green buildings. This course will provide an overview of what a green building is, different ways that contractors and their trades can get involved, and the key areas that fall under the contractor’s responsibility when executing a LEED project.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

     In order to download this course, a USD $35.00 fee must be paid.

  • While aluminum frames allow large glazed areas to maximize daylighting for energy savings and health benefits, aluminum is also a highly conductive material. This course explores how thermal barriers and high-performance glazing serve as a solution to aluminum’s conductive properties, to help achieve daylighting and thermal efficiencies in the commercial building envelope.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • A naturally occurring radioactive gas, radon is a silent danger to our health. Colorless and odorless, it enters homes and structures through openings in the foundation and below-grade walls, becoming trapped in basements and other poorly ventilated areas. This course looks at methods of controlling radon, how it is addressed in building codes, the advantages of closed-cell spray polyurethane foam (ccSPF) over other insulation materials, and proper installation techniques.

  • Redwood lumber and timbers from sustainably managed and harvested forests offer warmth, durability, and strength in indoor and outdoor projects. This course covers the performance characteristics, environmental benefits, and applications of Redwood, including several case studies that highlight the beauty and versatility of Redwood products. Details are presented on differentiating the grades of Redwood, specifying the right grade for the project type, and the specification resources that are available.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • Properties that include green space and common areas for people to interact in are more beautiful, livable, and desirable. However, attracting people also means taking into consideration car parking. Parking, while a necessity, is not the optimal use of land in any project. Architects and developers often have to compromise their designs or reduce the amount of revenue-generating space to accommodate the required parking space. In many cases, space is at a premium, and the project cannot go forward unless an architect can somehow “create space” to account for the needed parking density.

    A compact automated parking system is the solution to minimize the impact of parking. It creates more space that can benefit the property as a whole and increase the return on investment (ROI) for your clients.

  • The savings that water conservation measures can provide are real and practical and offer enormous untapped potential. One of the best ways to boost conservation really hasn’t been thoroughly utilized, yet it’s right here at our fingertips: faucets. This course provides an overview of commercial faucets, including the evolution of the modern faucet, design and installation considerations, and the faucet’s impact on water conservation and green building programs.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • Rubber has been recycled for more than a century and used in recycled rubber flooring for over 65 years. Over this time, it has been proven to be a durable and flexible product that improves numerous aspects of the built environment while benefiting the natural environment. This course examines the sustainability attributes of recycled rubber flooring, how rubber is recycled, how it is used to make flooring, its health and safety benefits, and where to use and not use the product. The course also includes an overview of how recycled rubber flooring can be used to meet a number of USGBC’s LEED® v4 BD+C and WELL Building Standard® v2 credit requirements.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • As we become more aware of the levels of toxins in our environment, we are realizing that the quality of air inside our homes is just as important as the quality of air outside our homes. This course outlines why indoor air quality is so important to our health and describes how to improve indoor air quality by using a balanced ventilation system.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • Designing restrooms to allow for and maximize proper hygiene is important in reducing the spread of germs. This course discusses the elements of hygienic restroom design and how reducing required touchpoints helps to increase safety and cleanliness. The key steps in proper hand hygiene are also discussed. The course then focuses on hand dryers and considers their impact on hand hygiene and sustainability. The future of commercial restroom design is then explored.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • Operable wall systems integrate the indoors and outdoors and define interior spaces, providing flexibility and additional usable area without increasing a building’s footprint. Occupants benefit from expansive daylighting and views as well as quick access to fresh air. This course describes the types of operable wall systems, how they contribute to sustainable design, and the various options and considerations for selecting the correct system.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • All vapor retarders (VRs) are air barriers (ABs), but not all ABs are VRs. Wait, what? How can that be? This presentation provides the practical side to the AB/VR discussion and identifies common VRs and ABs, how they're installed, and why AB/VR approaches vary according to the type of construction and building use.

  • Continuous insulation is part of building standards and state and energy codes due to its ability to reduce thermal bridging and the associated heat loss and energy consumption. This course looks at the use of polyisocyanurate as a continuous insulation in Type V and residential construction and its use as a multifunctional envelope component—air barrier, weather-resistive barrier, and vapor retarder—by reviewing code requirements for the building envelope.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • Incorporating nature into the built environment through biophilic design increases occupant well-being, productivity, and health and is an integral component of an ecologically healthy and sustainable community. Presented here is an overview of biophilic design, its relationship to sustainability, and its positive human, environmental, and economic outcomes. Case studies demonstrate how rooftop deck systems can contribute to biophilic and sustainable design objectives.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • Professional sports stadiums form large complexes with enormous impacts on the environment and local communities. Owners, architects, and operations managers can use this influence to generate a net positive effect on people, the natural environment, and the bottom line. In this video, the executives and consultants involved in the design and daily operation of Gillette Stadium and Mercedes-Benz Stadium discuss the challenges and opportunities of sustainable stadium design. Topics discussed include district energy generation, gray water treatment, evaluation and implementation of new technologies, partnering with local utilities, cost recovery, profitability, and community health.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • Good restroom design includes regard for user experience, environmental impact, good hygiene, and cost over time─hand-drying fixtures are a necessary element of this design process. In this course, we review how new technologies can address the hygiene, dry speed, sound level, and accessibility concerns of a restroom project. We also discuss why it is vital to specify hand dryers with optimum energy and cost efficiency.

Displaying 1 - 25 of 201 results.

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