Building knowledge and connections

Continuing Education

Category: 07 00 00 - THERMAL AND MOISTURE PROTECTION

Displaying 1 - 25 of 187 results.

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  • Demand for safety, energy efficiency, and contemporary aesthetics is driving building envelope design that incorporates increased amounts of combustible material in cladding, insulation, and water-resistive barriers. This course outlines the difference between insulated metal panels (IMPs) and aluminum composite material (ACM) panels, discusses reaction to fire and fire resistance, addresses building code and building envelope fire testing, and provides global case studies demonstrating the impact of IMPs on the building envelope after exposure to fire.


  • Water leaks and damage are some of the biggest problems encountered with masonry construction and cavity walls. The proper choice and installation of flexible through-wall flashing, however, can ensure that moisture is directed out of the wall cavity and the risk of potential damage is minimized.


  • Commercial aluminum wall, window, and roof systems have undergone improvements in recent decades, making them technologically sufficient to meet contemporary standards of durability. In addition to being familiar with the systems’ thermal and other ecological benefits, specifiers need to understand paint chemistry and the difference between powder and liquid coating application methods. It is also important to understand third-party specifications published by AAMA, which cover architectural coatings.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Concrete is a very versatile and fundamental building material; however, because it is porous and wicks water through its matrix, concrete has water-related design challenges. This program examines the sustainable benefits of integral concrete waterproofing and analyzes traditional waterproofing methods as compared to integral methods in terms of performance, durability, risk, cost, and construction timeline.


  • The need to evaluate thermal bridging in a building’s design and performance has become more prevalent because of the increasing requirements for more energy-efficient buildings. This course provides an introduction to thermal bridging, energy code requirements, and the use of thermal break solutions designed to improve energy efficiency in the building envelope.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • The facade is one of the most significant contributors to the energy consumption and comfort parameters of any building. This course explores high-performance building envelopes and the use of advanced insulated metal panel systems featuring integrated daylighting and ventilation components that combine to provide weathertightness and maximum thermal performance.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • High-performance buildings require envelopes with thermal, air, and vapor layers that are typically installed individually and by separate contractors, adding to the complexity of their construction. Integrally-insulated concrete tilt-up panels provide multiple building envelope layers in one element. In this course we’ll look at these insulated concrete walls, the types, their components, their thermal and moisture resistant properties, and where they are used.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Rainscreens are a multicomponent system offering redundancy in resisting the weather; however, continuity of each component is critical. When an insulated metal panel (IMP) is used within the system, it can function as a number of these components, simplifying installation and improving performance. This course looks at IMPs acting as barrier walls behind various rainscreen systems, with a discussion on the performance characteristics for air, water, vapor, and thermal management.


  • A rooftop solar photovoltaic system offers myriad benefits to both building owners and the environment; to maximize the benefits, however, it is important to be aware of the potential causes and effects of problems with rooftop installations. This course presents the issues to consider to prevent damaging the roof, voiding the roofing warranty, and incurring additional costs. Solar system mounting options are explored in terms of how they can help eliminate concerns around rooftop installations.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • NFPA 285 is a fire test for wall assemblies in noncombustible buildings that are wrapped in combustible materials. This course explains the NFPA 285 test method, its origin, its procedures, when it is required by the International Building Code, its relevance to ASHRAE 90.1 criteria for continuous insulation and air/water resistive barriers, and design considerations necessary for test compliance. Key combustible wall assembly layers such as insulation, air/water resistive barriers, and exterior cladding options are also discussed.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • The increase in building energy efficiency requirements has led to the use of exterior continuous insulation (CI) to improve the performance of the building envelope. This presentation reviews the benefits of polyiso continuous insulation and then examines in detail the NFPA 285 test standard and fire safety requirements of the 2018 International Building Code for the use of polyisocyanurate insulation in exterior walls of commercial buildings (Construction Types I–IV).

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) has been used in North America as a single-ply roof membrane for more than 40 years. Because of the longevity of PVC and its history of performance, PVC roofs have a lower roof replacement rate compared to other single-ply membranes. This course discusses how PVC is manufactured, its features and benefits, and comparisons between its performance and that of other thermoplastic single-ply membranes.


  • All vapor retarders (VRs) are air barriers (ABs), but not all ABs are VRs. Wait, what? How can that be? This presentation provides the practical side to the AB/VR discussion and identifies common VRs and ABs, how they're installed, and why AB/VR approaches vary according to the type of construction and building use.


  • Stone is perhaps man's oldest, most durable, most reliable, and most beautiful building material. It is now possible to acquire all of its benefits without the need for heavy, thick, and expensive walls and foundations. This course explains how natural thin stone veneer can be economically utilized to protect and beautify commercial, institutional, and residential indoor and outdoor surfaces, the varying attributes of different stones, the numerous looks that can be achieved, and the standards that inform their selection, specification, and usage.


  • Building science experts have acknowledged the need for both drainage and ventilation in exterior wall systems in order to eliminate moisture issues and extend the life of buildings. This presentation reviews the concepts of rainscreen technology and the solutions for rainscreen compliance with a focus on engineered rainscreen drainage and ventilation mats used in direct applied and ventilated wall designs.


  • Across the United States, building owners in hot and cold climates are subject to peak energy demand charges. This course examines the economic and environmental effects of peak energy demand as applied to modern buildings, focusing on how peak energy demand is incorporated into electric utility billing structures and how cool roofing yields peak demand and net energy savings for commercial buildings in all climates within North America.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • The surface coating is the first line of defense in prepainted metal, and one of the most important elements to consider as part of a metal purchase. Selecting the right coating, finish, and paint system can affect product lifespan, energy efficiency, and aesthetic appeal. This course discusses the composition of prepainted metal, its application and performance, and examines the building and environmental factors that may influence the type of paint system specified.


  • Insulated metal panels (IMPs) can be the right choice to deliver the excellent thermal capabilities and performance that architects, designers, and building owners demand. This course provides a review of insulated metal panel systems in terms of their performance characteristics, profiles, and testing/approval requirements, along with the design and installation considerations that are required to facilitate a successful project.


  • An expansion joint is a structural gap designed to accommodate the movement of a building in a controlled manner, preventing damage to the building’s internal and external finishes. Expansion joints run throughout a building in walls, ceilings, and floors. Expansion joint covers provide a covered transition across an expansion opening and remain unaffected by the relative movement of the two surfaces either side of the joint. This course explains how to determine joint movement requirements and how to size a joint. It also discusses the performance of different expansion joint cover systems and the applicable fire protection and building codes.


  • Standing seam metal roofing has been used successfully in the United States for centuries, and proper specification is key to realizing its intended performance. Examined here are: the factors driving the demand for standing seam metal roof and wall systems; standing seam panel basics; gauge and grade; oil canning; specification considerations; testing standards; and forming, delivery, storage, handling, and warranty.


  • The materials we use have a significant impact on the environment, our communities, and our health. Consequently, material transparency—wherein manufacturers disclose vital sustainability information about their products—is an increasingly necessary element of modern life. This course examines the tools and resources that are available for both manufacturers and the A&D community that effectively communicate transparency information and optimization of building products. Also reviewed are the benefits of the new-generation insulated metal panels (IMPs) designed to achieve a trusted range of health and wellness certifications.


  • Sinterization is a specialized manufacturing process that uses extreme heat and pressure to create a unique product called ultracompact surfacing material. This cutting-edge material can be used in ways that natural stone, solid surface, or quartz material cannot. This course examines the advantages of ultracompact surfaces in terms of life cycle environmental impact, strength, durability, chemical resistance, absorption, abrasion resistance, and ASTM testing. Design flexibility with ultracompact surfaces in terms of color, texture, and format is also discussed and possible interior/exterior application options are considered.


  • An expansion joint is a structural gap designed to accommodate the movement of a building in a controlled manner, preventing damage to the building’s internal and external finishes. Expansion joints run throughout a building in walls, ceilings, and floors. Expansion joint covers provide a covered transition across an expansion opening and remain unaffected by the relative movement of the two surfaces either side of the joint. This course explains how to determine joint movement requirements and how to size a joint. It also discusses the performance of different expansion joint cover systems and the applicable fire protection and building codes.


  • This course focuses on the changing energy codes and how they affect commercial wall assemblies. The new concept of continuous insulation (ci)—and how it is used throughout the codes—is discussed. The NFPA 285 fire test and its role in code-compliant wall assemblies is also discussed for commercial building types I–IV. The thermal performance, physical properties, and compliance attributes of polyisocyanurate insulation are explained, as well as how it compares with some of the other insulation options available.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Each year in the U.S. there are millions of fires, resulting in thousands of deaths, tens of thousands of injuries, and billions of dollars in property loss. This course examines firestop systems and their role in saving lives and property, with discussions on testing, technologies, and products that help prevent the spread of fire, smoke, and toxic gases.

Displaying 1 - 25 of 187 results.

FIRST [1-25] [26-50] [51-75] [76-100] [101-125] NEXT LAST