Building knowledge and connections

Continuing Education

Category: 25 00 00 - INTEGRATED AUTOMATION

Page: 1

  • The Internet of Things (IoT) connects buildings by providing real-time data for action and evaluative purposes. Plumbing products can be part of the connected building to reduce maintenance and costs, help conserve water, and provide extra health and safety benefits not achievable with nonconnected plumbing products. This course reviews some examples of the data that can be collected from commercial plumbing products to deliver critical information to building managers and owners. It also describes how these products create cost and time savings, enhance health, safety, and compliance, and contribute to overall occupant satisfaction and wellness.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • One of the most important concepts behind biophilia is the “urge to affiliate with other forms of life” (E.O. Wilson). Humans are connected to nature, inspired by nature, and desire to be harmonized with nature. This course discusses the main principles of biophilic design and explains how a connection with nature benefits human well-being, increases classroom performance, and reduces stress. Multiple case studies demonstrating the positive benefits of daylight and views on building occupants are discussed, and applications of biophilic design are examined.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • A large portion of new commercial and residential buildings built today are equipped with clear, floor-to-ceiling glass. Does this new expansive area of glass lead to daylight optimization? This course explains the impacts of daylighting on human health and building occupant comfort. Proactive and reactive automated shading systems are discussed, and the course explains how a properly designed shading system can reduce whole-building energy consumption. Automated shading systems in projects of various scopes and scales are also discussed.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Driven largely by public interest in minimizing the potential environmental impact of building products, architects and builders actively embrace “green” initiatives and are calling for building product transparency. The Environmental Product Declaration (EPD) was developed to address this need. This course examines the EPD and includes discussions on who wants EPDs and why, the EPD development process, the contents of an EPD, and the future of EPDs.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • It’s easy to be overwhelmed by outdoor solar lighting specs and components, especially when every manufacturer presents its products differently. Lighting professionals can help clients put these manufacturers on an equal playing field. Providing an in-depth introduction into the technology and benefits of off-grid solar lighting, the course explores why clients choose commercial solar lighting, what components make up a solar lighting system, and the three steps lighting professionals can take to ensure their clients choose a reliable, efficient, and cost-effective solution that meets their unique expectations.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Multifamily Group R construction has traditionally been access controlled by means of pin and tumbler mechanical locks. With the migration to electronic access control locks, it can be complicated to understand how to comply with building and fire codes. This course attempts to demystify electronic access control by addressing the basic components, important terms, and design and code considerations, and concludes with a look at a case study.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Kiln-fired glass is a fine art form with many architectural and interior design applications. This course explains how kiln-fired glass is produced, what the range of applications is, and how installations can meet architectural glass performance and safety requirements.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • Manufacturing companies are seeing an increased demand for product transparency. This course discusses what sustainability and Design for Environment are, how transparency documents are created, how they contribute to green building certification, and how investing in sustainability can produce process and operational efficiencies that benefit people, planet, and business.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Textile air dispersion systems have come a long way from the days of cotton diffusers and duct socks. Today's systems are custom engineered and constructed from advanced polyester fabrics that offer features and capabilities not possible with other air distribution systems. This course examines the similarities and differences between metal and fabric systems and highlights the design, performance, efficiency, and sustainability characteristics unique to textile air dispersion. As well, the wide-ranging application possibilities for textile systems are explored.

    Prerequisites:No

    Course Level:Introductory


  • Flexible work scheduling, telework, virtual work, and the high cost of office space are some of the drivers of the 21st century workspace. This open, flexible, adaptable, and casual space must still serve not only the technological needs of its users, but also the accessibility needs of a diverse population. This course examines the technical requirements for providing accessibility, universal design, and ergonomics in an open office space and looks at a variety of solutions in the functional areas of the office: open office areas, the workspace, and collaboration areas.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • Properties that include green space and common areas for people to interact in are more beautiful, livable, and desirable. However, attracting people also means taking into consideration car parking. Parking, while a necessity, is not the optimal use of land in any project. Architects and developers often have to compromise their designs or reduce the amount of revenue-generating space to accommodate the required parking space. In many cases, space is at a premium, and the project cannot go forward unless an architect can somehow “create space” to account for the needed parking density.

    A compact automated parking system is the solution to minimize the impact of parking. It creates more space that can benefit the property as a whole and increase the return on investment (ROI) for your clients.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • The availability of parking and the time it takes to park a vehicle are major challenges when designing a new development. Parking garages typically require big volumes and are not efficient with land use. Automated parking can practically reduce parking space, while providing the same (sometimes more) number of parking stalls as a conventional garage. It also improves the user experience, providing a valet parking experience, just without the valet.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • A comprehensive lighting plan is critical to the success of any residential design project. Proper lighting is effective and efficient and contributes to the comfort and functionality of the home. This course explores lighting concepts, sources, and controls. It discusses using layers of light to achieve design goals, and how to incorporate energy efficiency into lighting designs.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • By design, automatic pedestrian doors provide easier, more convenient access than manual doors for a wide variety of building types, and their popularity in commercial design continues to grow. Reviewed in this course are the available options of automatic door solutions, including sliding, swinging, ICC/CCU, and revolving door systems. Also discussed are the code requirements and considerations relating to automatic doors for proper specification.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • In response to steadily growing demands for more and more storage capacity and the costs and energy required to implement that storage, data center design is now focusing on solutions that conserve energy, materials, money, and space. This course explores the current influences that directly or indirectly affect energy usage and management, the resulting trends in data center development, and how containment strategies enable designers to optimize energy efficiency and create facilities with minimal environmental footprints.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Modern security bollards are highly engineered and tested devices that can withstand deliberate ramming by a 15,000 lb vehicle. Bollards are more than decorative boundary markers; they are an essential tool to protect lives and property. This course explains bollard crash testing standards, reviews the pros and cons of available bollard materials, and discusses steel bollard designs for low- and high-impact applications.


  • As urban areas become more dense, land values increase, and the demand for space becomes more challenging, developers are seeking alternative innovative approaches to parking cars that allow a project to proceed while meeting all parking and sustainability requirements. High-density parking (HDP) systems are able to park 30%–400% more vehicles than a traditional garage in the same amount of space. This course explains the origins, history, and types of high-density parking. The sustainable advantages of HDP systems are examined and design considerations are discussed.


  • The spread of smoke in mid- and high-rise building fires is recognized as a major threat to the safety of the building occupants and responding fire personnel and the effectiveness of firefighting operations. This course explains how smoke migrates in a multistory building fire and discusses how building codes have evolved to address this danger and why they mandate smoke containment in specific areas of a structure. Product applications and assemblies designed to meet building code requirements and limit vertical smoke migration via elevator hoistways and lobbies are examined.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

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