Continuing Education

RMMI. Rocky Mountain Masonry Institute - www.rmmi.org/

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  • The recent shift towards protecting the environment has also brought about a better understanding of our innate need to reconnect with our natural surroundings. This is known as biophilia. In this course, we will examine the elements of biophilic design and how to implement biophilic design strategies, known to improve physical and mental well-being of occupants. The use of resilient flooring in commercial applications offers an opportunity to implement biophilic design.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • Multiwall polycarbonate is an extremely versatile glazing material with high impact strength, excellent thermal insulation, and long-term light transmission. Compared to glass, it is much lighter and easier to handle, offering considerable savings in transportation, labor, and building costs. This course examines how multiwall polycarbonate systems can improve thermal energy efficiency and increase daylighting within a space, enhancing occupant productivity, health, and well-being.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • Play and music are both essential parts of our lives. When we can combine music and play together in a fun and engaging space, the benefits are numerous, no matter your age. This course discusses why play and music education perform such a critical role in the development of happy, healthy children. We'll discuss the copious amounts of research that tell us that music education has real-life benefits, such as increased IQ, language development, and social engagement, and the role music plays within multiple therapies for the elderly and those suffering from mental illnesses. The course finishes with an overview of how to design musical play spaces for safety and inclusivity.

  • The implementation of synthetic surfacing for leisure and performance applications is rapidly growing. Artificial materials such as synthetic turf (grass), synthetic green walls, and poured-in-place and court surfacing often outperform their natural counterparts. Additionally, increased safety standards and design expectations have accelerated innovation in the materials available to designers. This course outlines synthetic surfacing options and examines synthetic turf systems, detailing their design considerations, performance features, sustainability and health benefits, and associated return on investment (ROI).

  • With the ever-increasing focus on the sustainable built environment, building owners, architects, engineers, and contractors are incorporating structural steel into their designs. Presented here is a comprehensive view of the cradle-to-cradle structural steel supply chain from a sustainability perspective. Also discussed are steel production and design, steel’s potential contribution to LEED v4 credits, thermal capacity, and the environmental and life cycle benefits of prefabricated fireproof steel columns.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • Sometimes a design finish cannot be achieved within a certain budget or time frame. While not intended to be a substitute for real materials in every situation, architectural finishes mimic the aesthetics of natural and other materials. This course discusses the uses, manufacturing process, performance characteristics, selection considerations, and proper installation techniques of architectural finishes.

  • Unfortunately, gun violence is a reality, and design strategies must be employed to ensure a suitable level of protection and safety. This course addresses bullet-resistant fiberglass composite panels and the need for architectural armoring. The course discusses ballistic material testing and standards, the types of ballistic materials available, and fiberglass composite panel applications and installation considerations.

  • Acrylic solid surface is an attractive design solution, delivering enhanced aesthetics combined with superior performance properties. This course compares the characteristics of 100% acrylic solid surface to other surface materials and reviews the driving factors that contribute to its growing role in sustainable design strategies. Also discussed are the manufacturing, fabricating, and thermoforming processes of acrylic solid surface and the related green standards and certification programs.

  • Stairs are an essential component of a movement and wayfinding strategy in a structure and a primary means of egress, exit, and floor-to-floor access in the event of a fire or emergency for buildings with multiple floors or a change in rise. This course discusses stair and egress system design and evaluates why the design and fabrication of pre-engineered steel stairs create safe stair environments that comply with building codes.

  • Elevators are integral to accessible, smooth, and efficient operations in many applications. For low-rise buildings, hydraulic elevators or gearless machine room-less (MRL) elevators are most common; this course compares the two in terms of sustainability and cost. Also presented are the history of the elevator, types of elevators suitable for installation in a range of buildings, the distinctions between proprietary and nonproprietary elevator systems, and recommendations on how to specify a nonproprietary system to maximize its long-term benefits.

  • Air curtains provide a controlled stream of air across a door or window opening, creating a seamless barrier between two distinct spaces while still allowing a smooth, uninterrupted flow of traffic. Air curtains offer significant energy savings to building owners by helping to maintain interior building temperatures. This course examines how air curtains reduce whole-building energy consumption, provide thermal comfort, and maintain air quality even when a door is open. The basic principles and theory of how air curtains operate and how to properly identify applications and maximize the air curtain’s energy savings potential are discussed in detail. Selection, application, and installation of the various types of air curtains are also explained.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • With the relatively recent development of new products and procedures for polishing concrete, concrete floors have added aesthetic appeal to their list of impressive performance characteristics. This course will discuss improving and prolonging the performance of finished concrete floors by exploring the many benefits of concrete flooring, summarizing the procedure for creating concrete floors, explaining maintenance methods and spill removal, and explaining how a floor protection plan will aid in the prolonged service life of the floor.

  • The selection of windows and doors for a particular project must satisfy its aesthetic and functional requirements. However, we also want windows and doors to be safe, durable, leak-free, and energy efficient and meet the needs of those with disabilities. The International Building Code® and related standards ensure that windows and doors support public health, safety, well-being, and energy efficiency. This course provides an overview of the codes and standards for doors and windows, including weather resistance, durability, egress, safety, and accessibility requirements.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • This course explores the use of coil and extrusion coatings (70% PVDF metal coatings) for protecting and enhancing exterior façades. It demonstrates how utilizing color and aesthetic attributes can further enhance a building’s impact and brand recognition. The coating application/treatment process is also discussed in detail. Sustainability benefits that 70% PVDF coating has to offer are outlined, and real-world case studies show the positive impact that 70% PVDF coatings can have on a project.

  • The design community has become increasingly focused on ensuring that the products and places they create suit the diverse needs and differing abilities of everyone. This course explores how universal design principles and products can inform design to create places that are safer, more comfortable, visually appealing, and usable and that provide a richer experience for all users. This exploration utilizes the examples of door hardware and the needs of a diverse group of users including senior citizens and others to explain some of these principles and provides a detailed examination of a universally designed door latch.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • Local vacuum networks are economical and sustainable systems that provide deep, stable, high-quality vacuum to a variety of lab environments. In this course, the environmental and performance benefits of local vacuum networks vs. central vacuum systems are explored, along with discussions on their components and design and installation considerations. Brief case studies are used to highlight the wide range of flexible, adaptable solutions supported by this strategy.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • Now more than ever, architects and designers of commercial restroom facilities are responsible for meeting or exceeding guest and employee expectations for safety and cleanliness. Presented here are touchless fixtures for public restrooms, how restrooms affect sustainability goals, and the benefits of taking cost-saving measures.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • Aluminum drywall trim is a high-quality, easy-to-install material that can elevate drywall from a simple wall and ceiling treatment to the paramount feature of a sleek, modern design aesthetic. Provided here is a synopsis of the performance attributes and sustainability features of aluminum trim. This includes the types of trim available, installation details, and design potential, as well as the manufacturing, fabrication, finishing, and specification of aluminum trims.

  • All decking products designed for exterior use and under constant exposure to the elements will eventually show some signs of degradation; however, vinyl decking can be used to prolong the life cycle of various building products. This course examines walkable roof deck membranes and roofing systems and includes discussions on system characteristics, design considerations, and how to properly specify roof deck membrane systems. This program will be beneficial to architects, specifiers, and contractors involved in single- and multiple-family home construction.

  • Concrete is the most widely used construction material in the world, second only to water. Over time, as a result of the build-up of atmospheric compounds in the surrounding environment, concrete will become discolored, stained, dirty, and dingy. This course examines photocatalytic technology which accelerates self-cleaning and fights air pollution while maintaining the mechanical and physical properties of traditional concrete.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • The spread of smoke in mid- and high-rise building fires is recognized as a major threat to the safety of the building occupants and responding fire personnel and the effectiveness of firefighting operations. This course explains how smoke migrates in a multistory building fire and discusses how building codes have evolved to address this danger and why they mandate smoke containment in specific areas of a structure. Product applications and assemblies designed to meet building code requirements and limit vertical smoke migration via elevator hoistways and lobbies are examined.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • Currently, buildings are the single biggest contributor to GHG emissions, accounting for roughly half of all energy consumption in the U.S. and globally. It is crucial to reduce this level of consumption by including high-performance envelope strategies such as shading systems in all new building designs. In this course, we look at shading systems, examine shading and design strategies, and learn tips for successful selection and design.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

  • (Canadian Version) Different types of paints are typically classified according to the type of resin they contain or the mechanism by which they dry and cure. This course discusses the classification of paints, advantages and disadvantages of latex versus alkyd coatings, the benefits of a three-coat system, surface preparation and priming techniques, and causes of and solutions for common paint problems.

  • Fiberglass doors offer design professionals beautiful and durable options for their projects. This course discusses the physical and structural components of fiberglass entry doors and compares their performance to that of wood and steel doors. Described here are the National Fenestration Rating Council rating system, the North American Fenestration Standard, and the use of fiberglass entry doors to fulfill guidelines relating to ENERGY STAR® and LEED®.

  • Energy conservation and occupant health and well-being are issues of increasing focus in current building design strategies. Appropriate lighting design and control can address both issues simultaneously. This course explores those aspects of health influenced by lighting and the means by which lighting can be designed and controlled in order to increase occupant comfort, productivity, and overall physical and mental well-being and reduce energy consumption in a single, integrated design.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

Displaying 1 - 25 of 552 results.

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