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AEC Daily

AEC Daily

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Phone: 877- 566-1199
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  • The COVID-19 pandemic has affected societal behavior in many ways and will continue to affect it for some time to come. The workplace is one area that has been significantly impacted. This course explores how workplace environments can be designed and/or modified to create an environment that is safe for employees to reoccupy and that limits further spread of the virus. This exploration includes the examination of four specific products that can be integrated into the workplace setting to create safe, resilient working environments.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • ASCE 7-16, Minimum Design Loads and Associated Criteria for Buildings and Other Structures, provides several design alternatives that architects and engineers can use to reduce the potential for either partial or progressive collapse due to extraordinary events, whether natural or man-made. The minimum design load philosophy of the building code is at odds with some extraordinary events. ASCE 7, Section 2.5, “Load Combinations for Extraordinary Events,” which is incorporated into the IBC, covers such extraordinary events, stating: “Where required by the owner or applicable code, strength and stability shall be checked to ensure that structures are capable of withstanding the effects of extraordinary (i.e., low-probability) events, such as fires, explosions, and vehicular impact without disproportionate collapse.” There are several methods for achieving added safety in both expected and extraordinary events. These include performance-based design (for expected events) and methods for design against partial or progressive collapse (for extraordinary events). In this briefing, we’ll explore methods for design against partial or progressive collapse as found in ASCE 7, Section 1.4.6, “Extraordinary Loads and Events.”

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • As noted in the first course in this series, water-related issues resulting from growing and concentrating populations, shifting weather patterns, increasing frequency and ferocity of storm events, disappearing water supplies, and rising costs have become more and more important in community planning. This second part of the course details many of the emerging resilient and environmentally responsible management strategies that communities worldwide are adopting in response to those issues. The descriptions are accompanied by a number of case studies of resilient water plans and projects.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Growing and concentrating populations, shifting weather patterns, increasing frequency and ferocity of storm events, disappearing water supplies, and rising costs have made the provision of potable water and the management of other water-related issues increasingly difficult for many communities. This course explores the current state of water usage and water management practices and the emerging issues affecting potable water supply, stormwater, floodwater, and wastewater management that may affect those usage and management practices and inform the creation of alternative, more resilient ones.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Before the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic, organizations chose remote working to improve productivity, accommodate favored employees, and reduce their real estate costs. When governments ordered mandatory office closures to contain the virus, businesses with little or no experience in remote working were forced online. Until a vaccine is developed, remote working will continue, and firms must look beyond surviving to thriving. This briefing paper presents some key research findings about remote working and productivity. Evidence-based recommendations are made for how these findings could be applied to architecture and design (A&D) firms.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Businesses and organizations are preparing for employees to return to work, and architects and engineers are involved in many of the physical changes required to make workspaces safe. There are a number of publicly available “return to the office” guidance documents to help identify methods of ensuring the safety of building occupants. The AIA’s Re-occupancy Assessment Tool V3.0 is one of these guidance documents. It is a comprehensive guide that uses the framework of the CDC's hierarchy of controls as a method of classifying and organizing different levels of protection within a workspace. It contains 30 pages of checklists itemizing detailed control measures for limiting the spread of the virus within a building. A better understanding of the current science behind transmission may bring a better understanding of the “why” behind these control measures. In this 15-Minute Briefing, we’ll take a look at some of the science behind the measures.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • The magnitude and negative impacts of solid waste have become increasingly apparent, especially in regard to plastics and their presence in the oceans. As a result, there have been many approaches to rethinking what constitutes waste and how it can be avoided or used/managed in a more sustainable manner. This course explores these emerging approaches to waste management planning and illustrates them with current examples of solid waste management plans and initiatives from various countries around the globe. In the first part of this course, we’ll dig into the impact of our growing waste problem and some methods for rethinking this waste. In the second, we’ll provide guidance for the design of a sustainable community waste management plan.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Code-mandated requirements for inspections first appeared in the Uniform Building Code in 1927, and their original intent is still recognizable in our current codes: inspections by a building official are required at specific points in the construction process. In this course, we will examine an alternative to the periodic inspection process, the full-time inspector of record (IOR). We’ll review the historical context and qualifications of the IOR, when a project may benefit from an IOR, and the impact of using an IOR on life safety and property damage.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Energy creation, distribution, and consumption is in a period of transition. Understanding this transition and its benefits is critical to sustainable community energy planning (SCEP). This course reviews the transition forces, describes the systems that are emerging, illustrates them with international and national examples, details the steps required for SCEP and provides a comprehensive overview of the many renewable energy options now viable for community energy systems.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • The tools, techniques, and approaches to sustainable community planning (SCP) have evolved substantially in the last few decades, turning it from an abstract notion into a most comprehensive and beneficial planning approach. Part 1 of this two-part course examines the basic principles that these tools and approaches are based on, the local and global issues that they must address to be effective, and the nature and structure of the tools themselves. The review includes numerous links to the sources of these tools.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...