Building knowledge and connections

Continuing Education

Category: 04 00 00 - MASONRY

Displaying 1 - 25 of 51 results.

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  • Segmented pavers have been successfully used for roads, courtyards, and paths for hundreds of years. Durability of materials being one of the key reasons for their lasting popularity. These days modern pavers offer up a wide variety of newer performance capabilities and finishes. In this course, we’ll take a look at the unique technologies of segmental concrete paver systems, the types, finishes, and their design considerations.


  • Segmented pavers have been successfully used for roads, courtyards, and paths for hundreds of years. Durability of materials being one of the key reasons for their lasting popularity. These days modern pavers offer up a wide variety of newer performance capabilities and finishes. In this course, we’ll take a look at the unique technologies of segmental concrete paver systems, the types, finishes, and their design considerations.


  • Stairs are often a prominent feature or even the focal point of an architectural design project and play a vital role in creating an aesthetically pleasing interior atmosphere, or an exterior welcoming point to a residential, commercial, or industrial building. This course provides an overview of the many benefits of installing precast concrete stair treads and landings, how to detail and specify them, and how to address related building code, design, and construction requirements.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • High-performance buildings require envelopes with thermal, air, and vapor layers that are typically installed individually and by separate contractors, adding to the complexity of their construction. Integrally-insulated concrete tilt-up panels provide multiple building envelope layers in one element. In this course we’ll look at these insulated concrete walls, the types, their components, their thermal and moisture resistant properties, and where they are used.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Porcelain tile containing recycled content provides residential and commercial building projects with a durable, easy-to-maintain finish material for interior or exterior floors, walls, or other surfaces. This course highlights the eco-friendly production practices of porcelain tile and details its contributions to the design and performance of a building.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Current trends in architecture include the desire to reintroduce traditional articulated detailing concepts in a modern way. However, details that once were relatively straightforward to construct in mass masonry walls do not translate directly to contemporary anchored veneer construction. This course discusses the various aesthetic, weatherproofing, and structural characteristics that can be incorporated into anchored brick veneer, the limits of the prescriptive methods presented in the Building Code Requirements for Masonry Structures (TMS 402), and general detailing concepts to adapt these types of details to meet the safety requirements for anchored brick veneer integrity and attachment to the structure.


  • PICP plays a vital role in the urban restoration of natural hydrologic processes as it traps stormwater where it falls and slowly releases it into the ground. PICP is considered a best management practice by the Environmental Protection Agency and complies with National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System regulations. But in order to be effective, PICP must be properly and regularly maintained. This course addresses inspections, test methods, equipment, repairs and reinstatement to ensure PICP continues to contribute to green infrastructure goals.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Indiana limestone is featured in many iconic buildings across North America. Limestone composite panels offer the same beauty and durability as solid stone in a lightweight product that gains flexural strength and impact resistance from its aluminum honeycomb core. This course presents an overview of limestone composite panels from fabrication to installation, and explores the benefits, testing, and applications of this cost-saving and versatile cladding option.


  • Concrete is a popular, versatile, and durable construction material, and it has the potential to be very beautiful as well. Graphically imaged precast concrete is a creative, inspiring technology that can be used by architects and designers to create visually impactful building façades and other concrete surfaces. Discussed are the fabrication process, design possibilities, and budgeting considerations. Global case studies present a range of applications of both stock and unique designs.


  • Masonry is an ideal sustainable building construction material as it is extremely durable, recyclable, and reusable. It allows for extraordinary design versatility so it can meet both aesthetic and functional requirements. This course looks at the design elements, components, and construction techniques that characterize sustainable masonry cavity wall building envelopes.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • In today’s high-performance building market, specifying materials that work together as a complete wall system is more critical than ever. Systems can help designers meet new energy codes, reduce costs, and improve building function and sustainability while making the design process faster and simpler. Focusing on the most common exterior wall system, steel stud with masonry veneer, this course details key system components, recent advances in building analysis, code requirements, and a comprehensive systems approach.


  • Interlocking concrete pavers (ICP) have the ability to spread applied loads via the interlock between each unit. This means that the surface does not respond structurally as single pavers but as a composite paved surface. This structural characteristic of ICP allows the design method for these pavements to be based on flexible pavement design. In this course, we examine the ASCE and ICPI structural design methods for ICP and review examples using different soil strengths/stiffnesses and traffic uses. Finally, we survey the design and construction support material and software available from the Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute.


  • It is an expectation that today’s buildings have to be more than just aesthetically pleasing: they have to provide measurable, environmental benefits. This course outlines how insulated concrete forms (ICFs) help meet sustainable design objectives and examines the advantages that ICFs and ICF technology have over conventional construction materials for building envelopes in all building types.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Rooftop decks create valuable living and recreational space for building owners, residents, and clients. Accommodating restaurants, hotels, healthcare facilities, and everything from residential to government buildings, rooftop deck systems offer the design flexibility to create versatile, unique outdoor spaces over any structural surface. This course explores the features, surface materials, and design options for rooftop deck systems and provides an overview of recommended planning and installation guidelines.


  • Parks, recreational areas, and common rural and urban spaces can be essential relaxing oases. Pathways that navigate through these public spaces should be functional, durable, and complement the natural environment. This course explores pathway materials and focuses on decomposed granite (DG) and natural aggregates. It discusses the types of pathways, their applications, installation and maintenance, as well as their contribution to green design.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • As some of the earliest building materials, masonry and concrete have been used for their durability and strength. However, masonry architecture, both historical and contemporary, has been left vulnerable to water—the single most damaging element to masonry in our environment. This course identifies common water-related problems for masonry and concrete, describes protective treatments that increase masonry durability, and explains the process for safely selecting and applying a protective treatment.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • Building science experts have acknowledged the need for both drainage and ventilation in exterior wall systems in order to eliminate moisture issues and extend the life of buildings. This presentation reviews the concepts of rainscreen technology and the solutions for rainscreen compliance with a focus on engineered rainscreen drainage and ventilation mats used in direct applied and ventilated wall designs.


  • Modern construction has come to understand that a façade, as part of an overall building envelope, is not only a visual statement, but also an important influencer in the protection of a wall’s structural components, the energy efficiency of the building, and the health of its occupants. This course explores a unique surfacing material known as ultracompact surfacing (UCS) and evaluates its mechanical properties, technical characteristics, and aesthetics to illustrate its endless design potential in exterior cladding, façade, and rainscreen applications.


  • Movable pool and spa floor technology enables an entirely flexible, multifunctional living and recreational space to complement any architectural vision. Presented here are types of movable pool floors, pool floor technology, options and amenities, and safety and sustainability performance considerations.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • The construction of residential and commercial buildings that use less energy to operate and are long lived is a key part of sustainable design. Insulated concrete forms (ICFs) provide the necessary U-factor, airtightness, resiliency, and durability for all building types. Insulated concrete forms in residential and commercial construction projects offer excellent thermal performance and reduced energy consumption and operating costs, while maintaining a very comfortable and healthy interior environment. This course examines the ICF wall, including materials and components, and discusses design considerations and construction.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Extruded polystyrene (XPS) and expanded polystyrene (EPS) are both types of rigid foam plastic insulation; their different manufacturing processes produce wide-ranging performance attributes, especially in water absorption and R-value. This course discusses the negative impact of water absorption on R-value and structural integrity; explains why codes and standards are sometimes specific in requiring XPS in applications where prolonged exposure to water occurs; and concludes with a look at best specification practices for accurate bids.


  • Since ancient times, concrete mixes and carved natural stone have combined to create substance, beauty, and longevity in our architecture. Glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) was created to ensure that the attributes of concrete and stone continue to be enjoyed but with the efficiency in application that is expected in today’s world of design. This course covers the evolution of GFRC, its applications and how it is custom-created, its advantages, and how GFRC compares to other types of architectural concrete.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • Sinterization is a specialized manufacturing process that uses extreme heat and pressure to create a unique product called ultracompact surfacing material. This cutting-edge material can be used in ways that natural stone, solid surface, or quartz material cannot. This course examines the advantages of ultracompact surfaces in terms of life cycle environmental impact, strength, durability, chemical resistance, absorption, abrasion resistance, and ASTM testing. Design flexibility with ultracompact surfaces in terms of color, texture, and format is also discussed and possible interior/exterior application options are considered.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • Continuous insulation (ci) was introduced in the IBC (International Building Code) in 2006 as a new topic primarily in the northern tier climate zones. Over the course of the next two code cycles, continuous insulation has become part of the prescriptive path in all climate zones and for virtually all types of wall assemblies. This course examines different types of insulation materials commonly used as continuous insulation. Attributes that affect material use, installation, and performance within exterior wall assemblies are compared and discussed.


  • Stormwater management is a critical component in any municipality to retain and infiltrate increased runoff volumes and flow rates from developed land that creates increased impervious cover (roofs and pavements). There are many steps required to ensure a well thought out and complete permeable interlocking concrete paver (PICP) project that delivers the appropriate stormwater and erosion control. This course examines procedures for inspection of PICP. It addresses preconstruction meeting details, requirements for submittals and site inspection points from project start to completion. Various testing methods and inspection criteria are presented as well, and the importance of having an ICPI-trained contractor on the jobsite is discussed.

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