Building knowledge and connections

Continuing Education

Category: 04 00 00 - MASONRY

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  • There is a growing realization that the buildings we live and work in play an important role in the health and wellbeing of building occupants. Green building rating systems are starting to incorporate health and wellbeing criteria and this course will look specifically at how products and materials can help meet the health and wellbeing requirements across these systems.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Interlocking concrete pavers (ICP) have the ability to spread applied loads via the interlock between each unit. This means that the surface does not respond structurally as single pavers but as a composite paved surface. This structural characteristic of ICP allows the design method for these pavements to be based on flexible pavement design. In this course, we examine the ASCE and ICPI structural design methods for ICP and review examples using different soil strengths/stiffnesses and traffic uses. Finally, we survey the design and construction support material and software available from the Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute.


  • In today’s market, designers are always looking for innovative products that are beautiful, versatile, and sustainable. Glass-quartz surfacing encompasses all of these characteristics. This course describes the importance of recycled content surfaces and their environmental significance including reducing the use of natural resources and improving indoor air quality. Traditional and recycled surfacing materials are compared, the sustainable manufacturing process is explained, and case studies are discussed.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Masonry is an ideal sustainable building construction material as it is extremely durable, recyclable, and reusable. It allows for extraordinary design versatility so it can meet both aesthetic and functional requirements. This course looks at the design elements, components, and construction techniques that characterize sustainable masonry cavity wall building envelopes.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Concrete is often the substrate for both new and existing floors. Transforming the surface into a finished floor is far more sustainable than consuming additional flooring materials, adhesives, and transportation-related energy to install a floor covering. This course discusses the stages and options of the concrete polishing process, recognizes benefits of recent advances in concrete densification chemistry, and provides an overview of the limitations and possibilities for concrete floor finishes.


  • Indiana limestone is featured in many iconic buildings across North America. Limestone composite panels offer the same beauty and durability as solid stone in a lightweight product that gains flexural strength and impact resistance from its aluminum honeycomb core. This course presents an overview of limestone composite panels from fabrication to installation, and explores the benefits, testing, and applications of this cost-saving and versatile cladding option.


  • Mortars are utilized to bind masonry units together and fill the gaps between them. Understanding the critical relationship between bricks and mortar is fundamental to a successful installation. This course covers the performance and specification considerations related to the different types of mortar used for masonry construction, including portland/lime mixes, mortar cement and masonry cement.


  • PICP plays a vital role in the urban restoration of natural hydrologic processes as it traps stormwater where it falls and slowly releases it into the ground. PICP is considered a best management practice by the Environmental Protection Agency and complies with National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System regulations. But in order to be effective, PICP must be properly and regularly maintained. This course addresses inspections, test methods, equipment, repairs and reinstatement to ensure PICP continues to contribute to green infrastructure goals.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Ensuring proper use of methods and materials allows masonry walls to perform well and enjoy a long life. Use of masonry joint reinforcement and accessories is an essential part of this. This course provides a brief history of solid masonry walls leading up to the modern cavity walls of today, including a discussion of the basic working knowledge of masonry joint reinforcing, structural codes, and moisture control in cavity wall construction.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Since ancient times, concrete mixes and carved natural stone have combined to create substance, beauty, and longevity in our architecture. Glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) was created to ensure that the attributes of concrete and stone continue to be enjoyed but with the efficiency in application that is expected in today’s world of design. This course covers the evolution of GFRC, its applications and how it is custom-created, its advantages, and how GFRC compares to other types of architectural concrete.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • The construction of residential and commercial buildings that use less energy to operate and are long lived is a key part of sustainable design. Insulated concrete forms (ICFs) provide the necessary U-factor, airtightness, resiliency, and durability for all building types. Insulated concrete forms in residential and commercial construction projects offer excellent thermal performance and reduced energy consumption and operating costs, while maintaining a very comfortable and healthy interior environment. This course examines the ICF wall, including materials and components, and discusses design considerations and construction.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • In the wake of the green movement, combined with rising energy costs, building sustainability has become an important topic. This course reviews building practices that promote better building envelope design, the codes and standards that apply to energy efficiency, and the environmental advantages of using POLYISO continuous insulation in steel stud construction.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • There are many steps required to ensure a well thought out and complete construction project. This course examines procedures for inspection of permeable interlocking concrete pavement or PICP. It addresses preconstruction meeting details, requirements for submittals, and site inspection points from project start to completion. Various testing methods and inspection criteria are presented as well, and the importance of having an ICPI-trained contractor on the job site is discussed.


  • Building science experts have acknowledged the need for both drainage and ventilation in exterior wall systems in order to eliminate moisture issues and extend the life of buildings. This presentation reviews the concepts of rainscreen technology and the solutions for rainscreen compliance with a focus on engineered rainscreen drainage and ventilation mats used in direct applied and ventilated wall designs.


  • There are many important considerations and issues related to outdoor tile and stone surfacing installations. This course provides an overview of the causes of their frequent failures, a detailed description of a system which addresses those issues and avoids the failures, and case studies of successful system installations in various contexts.


  • Typically specified for pavements because of its strength, durability, and life-cycle value, concrete is increasingly being specified for a variety of exterior and interior projects because of its aesthetic potential. This course explores colored concrete including coloring methods, pigments, color consistency, and maintenance. It examines the specification considerations of cast-in-place and precast concrete and looks at a range of interior applications and concrete finishes.


  • The materials we use have a significant impact on the environment, our communities, and our health. Consequently, material transparency—wherein manufacturers disclose vital sustainability information about their products—is an increasingly necessary element of modern life. This course examines the tools and resources that are available for both manufacturers and the A&D community that effectively communicate transparency information and optimization of building products. Also reviewed are the benefits of the new-generation insulated metal panels (IMPs) designed to achieve a trusted range of health and wellness certifications.

    Prerequisites: None

    Course Level: Introductory


  • This course explains and illustrates how high-performance, fully composite insulated sandwich wall panels can be detailed to achieve continuous insulation. It explores the pros, cons, and attributes of wythe connectors such as carbon fiber trusses as well as panel insulation options, manufacturing and testing procedures, and installation methods. It concludes by providing a comprehensive set of sample installations to illustrate the broad range of building types and appearances that can be created with insulated sandwich wall systems.


  • As some of the earliest building materials, masonry and concrete have been used for their durability and strength. However, masonry architecture, both historical and contemporary, has been left vulnerable to water—the single most damaging element to masonry in our environment. This course will identify common water-related problems for masonry and concrete, describe protective treatments and their benefits, and explain the process for selecting and applying a protective treatment.


  • Concrete is the most widely used construction material in the world, second only to water. Over time, as a result of the build-up of atmospheric compounds in the surrounding environment, concrete will become discolored, stained, dirty and dingy. This course examines photocatalytic technology which accelerates self-cleaning and fights air pollution while maintaining the mechanical and physical properties of traditional concrete.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Brick selection is essential to a project’s durability and appearance. Molded brick, with its rich textures, colors, and shapes, has a timeless appeal that enriches the exterior of commercial and residential buildings. In this presentation, molded brick is compared to extruded brick and the manufacturing process is outlined. ASTM standards, classifications, and specifications are discussed, as are molded brick shapes and the use of molded brick in wall details. Modern examples of molded brick use are provided.

    Prerequisites: Introductory

    Course Level: Basic


  • Homeowners are looking for alternatives to traditional cladding materials that are affordable and long-lasting, and require little or no upkeep. Advances in technology and manufacturing techniques mean cellular PVC cladding products can meet all of these requirements without sacrificing aesthetics. This course reviews the benefits of cellular PVC as a cladding material and discusses how cellular PVC R&R prefinished shingles can provide the look and feel of wood shingles with an extended level of durability and low maintenance.


  • The concept of stabilized earth structures has been around for centuries. Historically, grass mats, straw, and branches have been used to stabilize soil. Now, soil reinforcement utilizes technologically advanced geosynthetic materials to secure earth in retaining walls, bridge abutments, and many other applications. This course reviews the basic concepts about segmental retaining wall systems, focusing on geogrid reinforcement applications, site conditions, and the construction sequence. Key success factors are also discussed.


  • Ultra-thin prestressed precast technology provides a versatile, lightweight panel that offers the strength and aesthetic versatility of concrete at a fraction of the weight. Reviewed in this course are the benefits, design and cost considerations, and the connection and fastening systems of prestressed precast panels in architectural applications.


  • Concrete is a popular, versatile, and durable construction material, and it has the potential to be very beautiful as well. Graphically imaged precast concrete is a creative, inspiring technology that can be used by architects and designers to create visually impactful building façades and other concrete surfaces. Discussed are the fabrication process, design possibilities, and budgeting considerations. Global case studies present a range of applications of both stock and unique designs.

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