Building knowledge and connections

Continuing Education

Category: 09 00 00 - FINISHES

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  • The 19th and 20th centuries brought numerous opportunities to revive classic architectural styles and—in the American West—the architecture and colors of the California missions, adobes, and Monterey Colonial homes provided unique and beautiful examples to support the new Mission Revival, Spanish Colonial Revival, Monterey Revival, Mediterranean Revival, and Pueblo Revival styles. This course explores local design and the architecture and color of historic buildings in the Southwest to show how it’s possible to establish color schemes representative of the American Western culture.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • Porcelain tile containing recycled content provides residential and commercial building projects with a durable, easy to maintain finish material for interior or exterior, floors, walls, or other surfaces. This course highlights the eco-friendly production practices of porcelain tile and details its contributions to the design and performance of a building.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Light-manipulating materials use internal channels to capture, bend, scatter, and redirect light and create visually stunning spaces. Panels and slabs in resin, glass, and terrazzo create an experiential surface for privacy screens or signage, primary or accent lighting, countertops or flooring—anywhere the interplay of light and shadow is desired for beauty and inspiration. This course describes the different types of light-manipulating materials and substrates as well as the design and installation options for a wide range of dynamic, unique applications.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Redwood offers warmth, character, durability, and strength in products from sustainably managed and harvested forests. This course provides insights into forestry practices and the environmental benefits of Redwood lumber, and compares Redwood with other common decking materials. Details are presented on how to differentiate and specify grades of Redwood; finishing options and methods are also discussed. The course concludes with examples of applications that showcase the unique beauty and attributes of Redwood.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • In order to address tile installation difficulties effectively and avoid failures, designers and specifiers must maintain full awareness of current knowledge, practices, and products. This course reviews potentially problematic contemporary tile installation issues along with the industry guidance, methodologies, and products available to address them.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • This course provides an overview of integral blind assemblies and discusses their benefits over conventional blinds, components and framing options, performance characteristics and testing standards, and common applications.


  • Commercial building interiors see all kinds of wear and tear on a daily basis. Various forms of wall protection can combat this wear and tear to help extend the longevity of a space, maintain a clean look, and cut down on maintenance costs. This course discusses the different wall protection products available, how to identify which wall protection products fit certain applications, and which building codes apply to these products.


  • A detectable warning surface is a surface feature designed to warn the visually impaired of hazards on a circulation path. Both the ADA accessibility guidelines and State of California regulations require detectable warning surfaces at a number of public right-of-way locations. This course looks at current guidelines and regulations for detectable warning surfaces, types of surfaces, and methods of implementing these regulations.


  • While the bathroom was once a strictly utilitarian space, a growing trend among luxury consumers is to create a custom, spa-like wellness retreat right in the home. Surveys find that luxury consumers value functional and design excellence, uniqueness that reflects a creative side, and exceptional quality and value. This course examines the shower products available that help to create a personalized, multisensory wellness experience with beautifully designed pieces that meet water efficiency standards.


  • Traditionally used for high-performance architectural applications, water-based PVDF coatings can now be applied to cellular PVC cladding materials, delivering high performance in a new application. This course presents the benefits of cellular PVC as a cladding material and focuses on water-based PVDF coatings, how they work, and how their performance characteristics contribute to their durability.


  • In recent years, demand has increased for better noise control in multifamily construction, driven mainly by consumer demands and stricter enforcement of existing codes. Residential noise control is a key component of design as it affects occupant privacy and well-being. This course reviews the dynamics of sound, how sound is transmitted through buildings, and the architectural techniques used to control airborne, structureborne, and flanking noise transmission in multifamily buildings.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • The hospitality industry thrives on positive customer experiences. These experiences are often shared on social media, and reviews of a restaurant or hotel now commonly include the acoustical aspects of the experiences. Hospitality venues must be constructed to the highest standards in order to achieve the necessary level of customer satisfaction; this includes providing a positive acoustic environment for a wide range of situations. In addition to reviewing the basics of sound, sound movement, and sound measurement, this course details the comprehensive range of applications available to the designer to block unwanted noises, control the acoustics in large venues, and provide complete privacy where it is needed while improving the aesthetic appeal of each space as a result.


  • Sinterization is a specialized manufacturing process that uses extreme heat and pressure to create a unique product called ultracompact surfacing material. This cutting-edge material can be used in ways that natural stone, solid surface, or quartz material cannot. This course examines the advantages of ultracompact surfaces in terms of strength, durability, chemical resistance, absorption, abrasion resistance, and ASTM testing. Design flexibility with ultracompact surfaces in terms of color, texture, and format is also discussed and possible interior/exterior application options are considered.


  • Surface design and color impact people in one way or another. Why do some surroundings induce a sense of calm, happiness, or inspiration while others offer nothing but distraction, discomfort, chaos, doom, and gloom? Interior surfaces are the point of contact between users and their environment, as well as an important connection between the visual and physical worlds. This course examines the integral role that surface color and design play in interior spaces and how color and design can improve health, reduce stress, enhance safety, and promote well-being in building occupants. Key requirements in the selection and specification process are also discussed.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory


  • Building owners value daylighting and views but face security and safety challenges with large amounts of glazing. Thermoplastic sheet products offer a variety of glazing solutions that resist security threats while providing transparency, strength, and durability. This course introduces the grades and characteristics of acrylic and polycarbonate sheet products and discusses how they meet the requirements for protection against forced entry and ballistics.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Specifying door products that are durable enough to withstand the rigorous demands of high-traffic applications in the healthcare and hospitality industries is crucial to the long-term success of each installation. This course reviews traditional doorway materials and doorway protection options, and provides design solutions that utilize engineered polyethylene terephthalate (PETG) components that extend the life of the door assembly and minimize health and safety issues for the building occupants.

    Prerequisites:No

    Course Level:Introductory


  • This course provides an overview of integral blind assemblies and discusses their benefits over conventional blinds, components and framing options, performance characteristics and testing standards, and common applications.


  • Quartz surfacing material is one of the most durable products in the market today. While there are many surfacing options available, such as natural stone, acrylic solid surface, ceramic, concrete, and laminate, none offer the flexibility, strength and endless design possibilities as a quartz surface. This course will examine the characteristics, attributes, and manufacturing processes involved with quartz surfaces. A comparison of other surfacing options will be discussed, as well as using quartz surfaces in healthcare system applications.


  • Large format floor tiles are elegant, classy, and timeless, and create spacious and stylish environments with high-end appeal. This course introduces a unique, cutting edge surfacing material known as ultracompact surfacing (UCS) and explores how it is manufactured, installation considerations, and the attributes that contribute to its superior performance and design potential.


  • Deck structures provide neat and sturdy living spaces that mirror interior conveniences while set in the ultimate, great outdoors. Choosing the right deck board for a specific project requires considering the size of the project, its location, and local climate conditions. This course discusses the performance characteristics and benefits of using multi-layer, cellular PVC decking—a durable decking material that replicates the unique beauty of exotic hardwood.


  • Specialty door and frame assemblies have been developed that are designed specifically for the built healthcare environment where performance criteria are critical. Reviewed in this course are specialty door and frame assemblies that meet the challenges of infection prevention, building cleanliness, patient privacy, and increased security, as well as containment of radio wave and radiation interference in hospitals and clinics.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • This course provides an overview of integral blind assemblies and discusses their benefits over conventional blinds, components and framing options, performance characteristics and testing standards, and common applications.


  • Thick 2 cm (20 mm) porcelain tiles that are specifically made for outdoor installations offer a blend of design, versatility, performance, simplicity of installation, and eco-sustainability. Many of the concerns regarding substrate preparation, bond failure, and slip resistance associated with laying thinner tiles outdoors are eliminated. This course discusses the material characteristics and installation of thick outdoor porcelain tiles—a paving system with high technical and visual performance.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...


  • Trim and molding occupy a small amount of space on a home’s exterior, however their aesthetic value outweighs their size. Properly designed exterior moldings and trim need a full understanding of the materials and the design rules and functions for each location. This course takes the reader through the design and installation of exterior moldings, in particular PVC molding, and looks at some common molding mistakes and solutions.


  • Current trends in architecture include the desire to reintroduce traditional articulated detailing concepts in a modern way. However, details that once were relatively straightforward to construct in mass masonry walls do not translate directly to contemporary anchored veneer construction. This course discusses the various aesthetic, weatherproofing, and structural characteristics that can be incorporated into anchored brick veneer, the limits of the prescriptive methods presented in the Building Code Requirements for Masonry Structures (TMS 402), and general detailing concepts to adapt these types of details to meet the safety requirements for anchored brick veneer integrity and attachment to the structure.

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