Building knowledge and connections

Continuing Education

AANB + ALBNL + NSAA. Architects' Association of New Brunswick - www.aanb.org

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  • Over the past few decades, exterior building spaces and roofs have significantly transformed from utilitarian ballasted roof systems to roof systems with highly programmed, environmentally conscious, people-friendly amenities that promote healthier lifestyles. A variety of products and materials can be utilized in the design and construction of roof gardens and decks. This course reviews the construction of basic types of roof systems and the range of hardscaping products that are available to designers.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Humans have been building successfully with natural stone for thousands of years, but there are still some misconceptions about dry-stacked stone retaining wall construction. This course addresses these misconceptions and introduces best practices for wall design and construction, the Federal Highway Administration and Associated Rockery Contractors guidelines and laboratory testing standards, and many key natural stone facts and sustainability attributes. It concludes with a number of illustrated case studies.

  • The planet is currently in a water scarcity crisis, which is significantly affected by toilet water usage. This course examines the current plumbing codes, standards, and regulations that address toilet water usage, the need for and benefits of going beyond current standards, and the goals of a variety of beyond-the-code voluntary standards and rating systems, such as LEED v4 BD+C and ICC 700 National Green Building Standard®. It explains the various types of low-flow and ultra-low-flow toilets, their pros and cons, and their selection criteria. It concludes with a sampling of successful cost- and water-saving installations.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Fiberglass doors offer design professionals beautiful and durable options for their projects. This course discusses the physical and structural components of fiberglass entry doors and compares their performance to that of wood and steel doors. Described here are the National Fenestration Rating Council rating system, the North American Fenestration Standard, and the use of fiberglass entry doors to fulfill guidelines relating to ENERGY STAR® and LEED®.

  • Recycled rubber flooring is an environmentally responsible material that outlasts many types of traditional commercial flooring products when exposed to normal foot traffic stress. Interior and exterior recycled rubber surfacing products are explored in terms of their sustainable design benefits and applications. The program includes discussions on rubber manufacturing, post-consumer tires, and green building certification programs.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Architectural canopies are versatile additions to a wide variety of commercial buildings and serve both functional and aesthetic purposes. They can highlight entrances, create visual interest, support signs and lights, and offer protection from snow, rain, and sun. This course examines canopy types, styles, materials, finishes, and wall attachment considerations and offers guidance on how to select the right system for a project. Case studies demonstrate how canopies can assist in solving common building design challenges.

  • Outdoor decks are commonly desired by homeowners and commercial property owners for both new and existing properties. Wood has long been the structural choice for outdoor deck materials. However, wood has disadvantages that can be mitigated with steel deck framing structural construction. In this course, we will discover that light-gauge steel (LGS) is lighter in weight than structural wood, is less susceptible to deterioration due to the elements and pests, requires less maintenance over time, is a sustainable material, and offers unparalleled safety features for dead loads, live loads, and environmental loads such as snow, earthquakes, and wind. Steel deck framing is quick to erect and provides for longer spans than wood of similar cross-sectional size. Structural materials can be easily lifted, and waste is reduced.

  • The beaches and proximity to the Atlantic Ocean are some of the advantages of living in Florida. However, the extreme wind forces from hurricanes can easily damage even the strongest buildings and cause billions of dollars in property loss. As a result, certain areas of Florida―Miami-Dade and Broward Counties—have been designated High Velocity Hurricane Zones. The building products used in these zones must be laboratory tested to meet extreme wind and pressure performance standards. This course explains why a metal roof system designed to minimize the damage from hurricanes is important.

  • In commercial, multifamily, and mixed-use applications, outdoor living spaces are a key amenity. Adding depth to storefronts, expanding outdoor services, or improving the comfort of a patio space can be attained with a functional shade structure. This course discusses the types and features of open-frame structures manufactured off-site, their recommended detailing and applications, and the key design considerations for safe and effective installations.

  • The Environmental Product Declaration (EPD) is not just an idea about how to “grade the greenness” of products; it is a well-developed, globally recognized way to make responsible comparisons and decisions regarding sustainable material design and continuous improvement. This course discusses the concept of the EPD as applied to building materials and how to integrate EPDs into design and product selection decisions. Detailed information from different thermal insulation EPDs is used to demonstrate how thermal insulation provides a unique and significant payback in terms of energy and environmental impacts.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Architectural laminated glass has become an increasingly desired material for indoor and outdoor projects, and digital imagery is a popular method of incorporating design elements. This course describes how vector graphics can be used in architectural design, what vector graphics are, and how they differ from raster images. It also examines in detail how vector graphics are used in architectural laminated glass.

  • People experience color in different ways and in different settings; in particular, people in healthcare settings who are vulnerable, healing, or aging are influenced by colors used in interior design. This course presents an overview of color and how we perceive it, as well as some of the research findings on color’s effects on psychological, emotional, and physical health. Designers will also learn how color can enhance safety, orientation, and navigation, and the role that non-SBR rubber can play in offering optimal flooring solutions for healthcare institutions.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Trees are essential for the health of the urban environment, mitigating the heat island effect, cleaning the air, reducing stormwater runoff, and improving residents’ health and well-being. But cities are often inhospitable to trees, where their growth may be stunted or their roots may damage surrounding infrastructure. This course explores ways to design successful projects incorporating green infrastructure by understanding the principles behind tree growth, proper type and amount of soil, water management, and the role of soil vault systems in helping urban trees thrive.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Insulating concrete form (ICF) products use a cost-effective and robust structural material option (reinforced concrete) to turn a building envelope into a high-performing thermal, moisture, and air enclosure with disaster resistance and built-in compliance with energy code requirements. As a result of ICF performance, building owners can complete a whole structure with ICFs and reinforced concrete, including intermediate suspended floors, rooftops, and multistory designs. This courses examines the advancements in ICF technology and discusses the potential contribution of ICFs to supporting improved sustainability and resilience.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Policies targeting the reduction of carbon emissions associated with building products require the disclosure of embodied carbon data to inform those policies and verify whether reduction targets or incentive requirements have been met. This course aims to provide a guide to collecting high-quality embodied carbon data.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Highly customizable electric heating solutions can provide either the main or supplemental heat for most indoor and outdoor spaces. Such solutions can harmonize beautifully with every architectural context and building configuration while addressing the full range of health, safety, comfort, and energy efficiency issues facing contemporary designers. This course examines the many supplemental electric heating solutions and devices available, their capabilities and configuration options, and how they can be customized to suit every unique architectural and engineering demand. It concludes with several illustrated cases.

  • Today's architects are faced with a difficult task: how best to design buildings that meet up-to-date energy codes while keeping costs down and clients happy. Developments in filtration technology make it possible to conserve energy, improve indoor air quality (IAQ), and dramatically reduce ongoing utility and operating costs. This course reviews advanced engineered solutions for energy savings and air quality for commercial, institutional, medical, pharmaceutical, and other critical applications.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Siding adds to the attractiveness of a residence while protecting the home from damage by the elements. Options for siding and trim encompass a variety of materials, including engineered wood, natural wood, fiber cement, and vinyl. This course reviews the features, performance characteristics, styles, and installation considerations of engineered wood siding and trim products.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Lightweight, impact resistant, and easily molded, polycarbonate's durability and versatility allow it to turn innovative, imaginative architectural designs into a cost-effective reality. This course outlines polycarbonate's effectiveness in bringing natural light into enclosed spaces, its role in improving the mental well-being of building occupants, its advantages over other panel/sheet materials, and its aesthetic virtues.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • The first course of this series from the Carbon Leadership Forum provides a high-level overview of embodied carbon: how it is defined, its significance in the global climate crisis, and how it is impacted by the construction industry. In addition, the course examines procurement policies as an embodied carbon reduction strategy—in particular, the Buy Clean policies, their uptake in the US, and their key elements.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Historically, traditional waterproofing methods involve the placement of a barrier or membrane between the concrete and water. Unlike membranes and other surface systems, crystalline waterproofing is designed to make the concrete itself waterproof. This course discusses how crystalline waterproofing technology provides a high level of performance to concrete structures and what design professionals need to know in order to specify and understand how this chemical technology can improve building projects, cut costs, and help earn LEED® credits.

  • Fireplaces remain one of the most desirable household features for homeowners, complementing a range of different lifestyles and appealing to a range of demographics. This course provides an overview of electric fireplaces, focusing on their design possibilities, flame technologies, ease of installation, environmental efficiency, cost-saving benefits, and their advantages over gas and wood-burning fireplaces.

  • In the fight against climate change, efforts intensify against the planet’s number one enemy—carbon dioxide. The building industry will play a significant role in these efforts. Embodied carbon—the global greenhouse gas emissions generated from sourcing raw material and processing, manufacturing, transporting, and installing building materials—will be the target over the next decade. This course will define embodied carbon, its impact on greenhouse gas emissions, the construction industry's impact, and the methods and tools that building designers can employ to limit embodied carbon.

  • For many applications, well-designed glass fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) composites deliver significant value and advantages over metal, wood, or concrete materials. In corrosive environments, FRP can decrease maintenance downtime and offer cost savings. This course identifies the components of FRP composites and discusses how using FRP can provide substantial, life-cycle cost savings and a long, maintenance-free service life along with meeting FM and UL wind and fire approvals. Various case studies are also examined.

  • Resiliency is a growing necessity. It is important to understand the impacts on the built environment resulting from natural and manmade disasters and disturbances and to design for those impacts now. Presented in this course is an overview of the benefits of using steel doors as part of a resilient design strategy for applications requiring resistance to blasts, tornadoes, and ballistics.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

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