Building knowledge and connections

Continuing Education

OntarioACHI. Ontario Association of Certified Home Inspectors - www.ontarioachi.ca

Displaying 1 - 25 of 197 results.

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  • Insulating concrete form (ICF) products use a cost-effective and robust structural material option (reinforced concrete) to turn a building envelope into a high performing thermal, moisture, and air enclosure, with disaster resistance and built-in compliance with energy code requirements. As a result of their performance, building owners can complete a whole structure with ICFs and reinforced concrete, including intermediate suspended floors, roof tops, and multi-story designs. This course examines the advancements in ICF technology and discusses the potential contribution held by ICFs to support improved sustainability and resilience.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Today—as climate change, population growth, and record droughts present an unprecedented strain on our water supply—conservation technology is building awareness to the importance of having the most water efficient fixtures in a home or business. This course recognizes the flush toilet as one of the biggest users of water and discusses how toilet design is pushing flush technology to develop ways for homes and commercial buildings to conserve water without sacrificing the performance of the toilet. Industry testing protocols and the water-saving capabilities of different technologies are evaluated.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Insulated metal panels (IMPs) fulfill several functions of the building envelope and numerous aspects should be considered in their design from a structural, energy efficiency, and fire safety standpoint. Reviewed in this course are the specification considerations, design opportunities, and the standards and policies pertaining to IMP systems. Also discussed are the many performance benefits and green advantages IMPs offer over traditional building envelope materials.

  • Expanded polystyrene (EPS) is a molded, lightweight, resilient, foamed plastic that is used in a variety of construction products. The impact-absorbing and structural properties of EPS provide a unique advantage over alternative materials. This course provides a review of EPS insulation, EPS geofoam, and ICF/SIP building system solutions produced using sustainable EPS manufacturing processes. Applicable material properties, product standards, and code references are also discussed.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Moisture infiltration through a building envelope can cause widespread damage to building elements and construction materials. In some cases, it can threaten or destroy a building’s structural integrity. The components of today’s waterproofing systems for above- and below-grade floors and walls or plaza decks are designed to work together to provide tight, durable, and complete protection against not just water but also all other environmental contaminants. This course discusses the fundamentals of waterproofing design, the types of materials used, and the considerations for selecting a waterproofing system to meet the requirements of a building project.

  • Metals are ubiquitous in today's hardscape and are used in a variety of applications. This course reviews the important considerations related to the proper material, finish, and manufacturing technique to meet the function, aesthetic, and budget of metal designs for hardscape applications.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

  • Extruded polystyrene (XPS) and expanded polystyrene (EPS) are both types of rigid foam plastic insulation; their different manufacturing processes produce wide-ranging performance attributes, especially in water absorption and R-value. This course discusses the negative impact of water absorption on R-value and structural integrity; explains why codes and standards are sometimes specific in requiring XPS in applications where prolonged exposure to water occurs; and concludes with a look at best specification practices for accurate bids.

  • Electrical devices impact the health, safety, and welfare of building occupants, so proper specification is critical. This course looks at electrical devices and the safety issues associated with them. The course includes discussions on the features of duplex receptacles, hospital grade receptacles, GFCIs and other electrical devices, and also discusses updated UL requirements and NEC codes.

  • The construction of residential and commercial buildings that use less energy to operate and are long lived is a key part of sustainable design. Insulated concrete forms (ICFs) provide the necessary U-factor, airtightness, resiliency, and durability for all building types. Insulated concrete forms in residential and commercial construction projects offer excellent thermal performance and reduced energy consumption and operating costs, while maintaining a very comfortable and healthy interior environment. This course examines the ICF wall, including materials and components, and discusses design considerations and construction.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Innovative and sustainable, powder-coated/sublimated extruded aluminum products are ideal for exterior, interior, and high-traffic architectural applications. Reviewed in this course is an overview of the properties and finishing processes of this material along with discussions of its applications, design criteria, and testing standards.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • The Environmental Product Declaration (EPD) is not just an idea about how to “grade the greenness” of products; it is a well-developed, globally recognized way to make responsible comparisons and decisions regarding sustainable material design. This course discusses the concept of the EPD as applied to building materials and how to integrate EPDs into design and product selection decisions. Detailed information from different thermal insulation EPDs is used demonstrate how thermal insulation provides a unique and significant “pay-back” in terms of energy and environmental impacts.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Their cost, flexibility, and relative ease of installation are just a few of the reasons that single-ply roofing membranes have seen a growth in popularity over the years. With a focus on commercial roofing systems, this course explores the drawbacks of traditional asphaltic roofing as well as the advantages and disadvantages of single-ply roofing systems and their attachment technologies.

  • Specifying door products that are durable enough to withstand the rigorous demands of high-traffic applications in the healthcare and hospitality industries is crucial to the long-term success of each installation. This course reviews traditional doorway materials and doorway protection options, and provides design solutions that utilize engineered polyethylene terephthalate (PETG) components that extend the life of the door assembly and minimize health and safety issues for the building occupants.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

  • This course provides a summary of the major changes to the Ontario Building Code that came into effect on January 1, 2020. The course is specifically tailored for architects, engineers, and interior designers. The major changes include smoke spread provisions in high buildings, distance between exit discharge doors, re-entry requirements for low buildings, accessibility amendments, and new provisions for foamed plastic and insulation. The primary intent of the changes was to harmonize the Ontario Building Code with the National Building Code of Canada and provide clarification on existing code provisions.

    Prerequisites: Knowledge of the Ontario Building Code

    Course Level: Intermediate

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

     In order to download this course, a USD $29.00 fee must be paid.

  • Restroom facilities should provide easy access and use for all users, regardless of ability. It is becoming increasingly important to know the tools needed to properly plan an accessible restroom that will meet the requirements of the ADA and other standards. This course will explore how accessibility standards accommodate a wide range of users, including how to design lavatories, toilet compartments, bathing facilities, and their accessories to meet accessibility requirements.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • The inherent properties of concrete masonry, including strength, durability, and fire safety, have been well documented, though a perception of high cost persists. However, due to significant changes to codes and standards that have increased the flexibility of concrete masonry systems, these systems offer cost-effective solutions. This course reviews changes to ASTM C90 and the masonry design standard and includes a discussion on the benefits and opportunities these new requirements bring.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Basic

  • Moisture within roof assemblies, or the concern over such, can be a major focus of discussion for the design/build community due to project schedule delays and disruptions to businesses and institutions. Despite the disruption to projects this issue causes, there remain significant misunderstandings across the industry regarding product warranties, field moisture tests, and just how long it takes concrete “to dry.” This course discusses common terms associated with concrete that are often misused and misunderstood. Further, the various sources of roof system moisture are identified with clear recommendations given as to how a specification can proactively address potential moisture-associated problems within a roof assembly.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

  • Western red cedar's (WRC) aesthetic, economic, and environmental benefits are just some of the reasons why builders and designers are increasingly gravitating to this species of wood. Presented here are modern, historical, and cultural uses of western red cedar, as well as its performance characteristics, grade specification, and finishes. Also discussed are sustainable forest management practices and certification agencies, and how sustainably sourced wood can contribute to LEED® credits.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Stairs are often a prominent feature or even the focal point of an architectural design project and play a vital role in creating an aesthetically pleasing interior atmosphere, or an exterior welcoming point to a residential, commercial, or industrial building. This course provides an overview of the many benefits of installing precast concrete stair treads and landings, how to detail and specify them, and how to address related building code, design, and construction requirements.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Vinyl plays a major role in the design and construction of modern buildings, and it contributes to sustainability, wellness and resilience of people and their communities. This course demonstrates the importance of achieving client performance goals using thoughtful, multi-attribute material selection criteria.

  • In order to address tile installation difficulties effectively and avoid failures, designers and specifiers must maintain full awareness of current knowledge, practices, and products. This course reviews potentially problematic contemporary tile installation issues along with the industry guidance, methodologies, and products available to address them.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

  • When designing a steel mesh fence, there are three steel mesh options to consider: chain link fabric, expanded metal, and welded wire mesh. Although mesh choice may be the primary focus when designing fence, an understanding of the application and material specifications should be key considerations as well. This course provides a review of the material specifications, installation, and standards related to the design of steel mesh fence systems.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

  • Surface design and color impact people in one way or another. Why do some surroundings induce a sense of calm, happiness, or inspiration while others offer nothing but distraction, discomfort, chaos, doom, and gloom? Interior surfaces are the point of contact between users and their environment, as well as an important connection between the visual and physical worlds. This course examines the integral role that surface color and design play in interior spaces and how color and design can improve health, reduce stress, enhance safety, and promote well-being in building occupants. Key requirements in the selection and specification process are also discussed.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

  • Protected membrane roof (PMR) systems offer many benefits to building owners and provide architects with design options that can maximize the energy efficiency, durability, and performance of a building envelope. This course compares the functional and physical features of PMR systems to conventional low-slope roofing applications and discusses the standard ASCE 7 and its impact on wind uplift design.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

  • Aluminum as a building material has been in use for almost 90 years and in that time has proved to be safe, reliable, and extremely durable. Because the energy and resources required to produce it have been radically reduced recently, it is now regarded as one of the most sustainable building materials available. This course explores how the many benefits of aluminum can be incorporated into the design of attractive, strong, extremely durable, and corrosion-resistant aluminum fences and railings; how these products can be finished, specified, and installed; and the codes and standards that inform and govern their use.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level: Introductory

Displaying 1 - 25 of 197 results.

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