Continuing Education

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Browse the courses that were most recently added to AEC Daily.

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Displaying 1 - 25 of 592 results.

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  • The design of behavioral healthcare facilities should address the therapeutic and safety needs of patients and staff while meeting the applicable codes and regulations. Reviewed in this course are ligature-resistant products developed for patient rooms and bathrooms that strike the balance between providing the safest design solutions and creating a noninstitutional environment.

  • Glass doors, windows, and storefronts are among the most vulnerable points of entry in the building envelope, and with episodes of riots, smash-and-grab crime, forced entry, and active shooters on the rise, the need for security glazing is growing. This course provides an understanding of the physical security needs of the built environment and what requirements should be met by threat mitigation products for existing storefront and building glazing. The course focus is on a new generation of clear, retrofit security “over-glaze” systems, utilizing heavy-gauge, architectural-grade polycarbonate and extruded framing designed to resist forced entry and ballistic attacks.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Recycled rubber flooring is an environmentally responsible material that outlasts many types of traditional commercial flooring products when exposed to normal foot traffic stress. Interior and exterior recycled rubber surfacing products are explored in terms of their sustainable design benefits and applications. The program includes discussions on rubber manufacturing, postconsumer tires, and green building certification systems.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • When the asphalt fumes, open flame, and kettles that accompany hot-applied roofing are not permissible, cold-applied roofing is an option. There are a variety of types of cold-applied roofing that offer easy portability of materials to the roof, smaller roofing crews, ease of application, and a low-VOC option. In this course, we focus on the adhesive application of modified bitumen membranes using bituminous cold-process adhesives, the adhesive types, their components and characteristics, application methods, and design and use considerations.

  • Western red cedar's (WRC) aesthetic, economic, and environmental benefits are just some of the reasons why builders and designers are increasingly gravitating to this species of wood. Presented here are modern, historical, and cultural uses of western red cedar, as well as its performance characteristics, grade specification, and finishes. Also discussed are sustainable forest management practices and certification agencies, and how sustainably sourced wood can contribute to LEED® credits.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • The variety of wheelchair lifts on the market can present a challenge to specifiers. Not only is there a wide range of design features, but also some lifts may not meet all ADA requirements for a given application. This course covers the features and the code and regulatory requirements of vertical wheelchair lifts, and the benefits of specifying a vertical wheelchair lift solution to both the user and the facility owner.

  • The issue of safety is a prevalent theme in today’s society and protecting the built environment has become a priority. This course examines the material specifications, industry standards, hardware options, installations, and application considerations necessary to design and specify exterior pedestrian steel gates.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Fireplaces remain one of the most desirable household features for homeowners, complementing a range of different lifestyles and appealing to a range of demographics. This course provides an overview of electric fireplaces, focusing on their design possibilities, flame technologies, ease of installation, environmental efficiency, cost-saving benefits, and their advantages over gas and wood-burning fireplaces.

  • Various surveys indicate that up to 90% of Americans prefer showering over bathing. In addition, there are many for whom bathtubs are major hazards and who must use an accessible shower. As a result, showers are the new norm for the hospitality industry and are often a central design element in hospitality and multifamily units. They are also often the choice and focus of seniors modifying their homes to facilitate aging in place and homeowners updating their bathrooms to increase their property value. This illustrated course discusses the three basic types of contemporary shower enclosures, their installation requirements and specifications, the wide range of glazing options and appearances available, and applicable codes and standards that inform and/or regulate shower installations.

  • Power and charging requirements for hospitality facilities are changing radically and rapidly. This course examines the options for and benefits of supplying power and charging outlets in walls, furniture, headboards, nightstands, public seating, and public gathering spaces, including outdoor areas, as well as the applicable codes for furniture-based power outlets. The course concludes with an overview of the benefits of occupancy sensors and auto-off switches in guest rooms and the installation requirements to comply with energy and electrical codes.

  • Frameless glass railing systems are completely post-free and offer a minimalist aesthetic that maximizes views. This course presents the IBC code requirements for glass railing systems and explores how to specify the appropriate mounting, glass, and handrail components for the substrate, location, and expected use. Case studies of completed projects illustrate the unlimited design possibilities of frameless glass railings.

  • Sealed integral blind assemblies are a low-maintenance and cost-effective solution where shading, privacy, sound mitigation, security, or sterile conditions are required. Presented here are integral blind assemblies and their benefits over conventional blinds, components and framing options, performance characteristics and testing standards, and common applications.

  • PICP plays a vital role in the urban restoration of natural hydrologic processes as it traps stormwater where it falls and slowly releases it into the ground. PICP is considered a best management practice by the Environmental Protection Agency and complies with National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System regulations. But in order to be effective, PICP must be properly and regularly maintained. This course addresses inspections, test methods, equipment, repairs, and reinstatement to ensure PICP continues to contribute to green infrastructure goals.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Interlocking concrete pavers (ICP) have the ability to spread applied loads via the interlock between each unit. This means that the surface does not respond structurally as single pavers but as a composite paved surface. This structural characteristic of ICP allows the design method for these pavements to be based on flexible pavement design. In this course, we examine the ASCE and ICPI structural design methods for ICP and review examples using different soil strengths/stiffnesses and traffic uses. Finally, we survey the design and construction support material and software available from the Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute.

  • Stormwater management is a critical component in any municipality to retain and infiltrate increased runoff volumes and flow rates from developed land that creates increased impervious cover (roofs and pavements). The course discusses the hydrologic and structural design fundamentals of permeable interlocking concrete pavement (PICP) and why it is an excellent choice to help meet stormwater management goals. Discussions include the benefits of using PICP, components of PICP, design and construction considerations and how use of PICP can help earn LEED® credits.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • In recent years, demand has increased for better noise control in multifamily construction, driven mainly by consumer demands and stricter enforcement of existing codes. Residential noise control is a key component of design as it affects occupant privacy and well-being. This course reviews the dynamics of sound, how sound is transmitted through buildings, and the architectural techniques used to control airborne, structureborne, and flanking noise transmission in multifamily buildings.

  • Commercial aluminum wall, window, and roof systems have undergone improvements in recent decades, making them technologically sufficient to meet contemporary standards of durability. In addition to being familiar with the systems’ thermal and other ecological benefits, specifiers need to understand paint chemistry and the difference between powder and liquid coating application methods. It is also important to understand third-party specifications published by AAMA, which cover architectural coatings.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Properties that include green space and common areas for people to interact in are more beautiful, livable, and desirable. However, attracting people also means taking into consideration car parking. Parking, while a necessity, is not the optimal use of land in any project. Architects and developers often have to compromise their designs or reduce the amount of revenue-generating space to accommodate the required parking space. In many cases, space is at a premium, and the project cannot go forward unless an architect can somehow “create space” to account for the needed parking density.

    A compact automated parking system is the solution to minimize the impact of parking. It creates more space that can benefit the property as a whole and increase the return on investment (ROI) for your clients.

  • Strength and conditioning facilities are designed for high-performance athlete training at the professional, international, national, collegiate, and high school levels. These facilities are fundamentally different than commercial fitness centers (which focus on improving general fitness) and must be custom designed for the athletes' sport-specific training programs. This course reviews key design considerations for these facilities, including specialized flooring construction required for athlete safety and preservation of building structure.

  • Rubber has been recycled for more than a century and used in recycled rubber flooring for over 65 years. Over this time, it has been proven to be a durable and flexible product that improves numerous aspects of the built environment while benefiting the natural environment. This course examines the sustainability attributes of recycled rubber flooring, how rubber is recycled, how it is used to make flooring, its health and safety benefits, and where to use and not use the product. The course also includes an overview of how recycled rubber flooring can be used to meet a number of USGBC’s LEED® v4 BD+C and WELL Building Standard® v2 credit requirements.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • While all pavements require maintenance and eventually rehabilitation, the modular nature of interlocking concrete pavement (ICP) requires maintenance procedures distinctly different from those for monolithic pavements. This course provides information on surface cleaning, sealers, sealing procedures, and joint sand stabilization. Repair procedures for the subgrade, base, bedding, and paver layers are also provided. Snow management techniques are addressed, and the course concludes with an in-depth look at pavement management using ASTM procedures for establishing a pavement condition index.

  • This presentation provides a review of life-cycle cost analysis (LCCA), a process increasingly conducted by road agencies for pavement projects. LCCA enables and, in some cases, justifies a pavement type that best meets an agency’s needs and budget. This presentation emphasizes the whole-life costs for interlocking concrete pavements (ICP), which combine the performance advantages of conventional concrete and asphalt with potentially lower life-cycle costs compared to other pavement materials.

  • As impervious land cover increases, so does the need for stormwater management. Concrete grid pavements provide increased infiltration rates, positively affecting runoff flow while decreasing erosion. This course introduces the range of grid pavement and erosion control applications and provides design and construction guidelines. Environmental performance is defined via conclusions from several research projects. Concrete grid pavements require minimal maintenance when properly designed and installed in appropriate applications. This course also includes an overview of how concrete grid paving units can be used to meet a number of LEED® v4.1 BD+C credit requirements.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • Through sustainable management, the forests of New England have had a remarkable comeback since the 1830s, with eastern white pine being the most represented softwood in these forests. This light, yet strong wood species has been used for generations and today, meets the requirements of a renewable and sustainable building material. This course reviews eastern white pine’s contribution to sustainability, its grading rules, wood products, and many applications.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

  • ICF construction is cost effective and sustainable, and is a superior way to build stronger, quieter, healthier, and more energy-efficient commercial structures. This course explores insulated concrete form (ICF) construction, describing the forms themselves and their construction, performance, and sustainable benefits. Also presented are design guidelines, the installation process, flooring systems, and commercial project applications.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details...

Displaying 1 - 25 of 592 results.

FIRST [1-25] [26-50] [51-75] [76-100] [101-125] NEXT LAST