Building knowledge and connections

Continuing Education

Category: 10 00 00 - SPECIALTIES

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  • Unfortunately gun violence is a reality and design strategies must be employed to ensure a suitable level of protection. This course addresses bullet-resistant fiberglass composite panels and the need for architectural armoring. The course discusses ballistic material testing and standards, the types of ballistic materials available, and fiberglass composite panel applications and installation considerations.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.


  • Explosion relief systems reduce damage and loss when an explosion occurs within facilities where potentially dangerous material is being handled or produced. These systems function by immediately reducing pressure during an explosion and are imperative to protecting a company’s assets and employees. Explosion relief systems are also referred to as explosion relief panels, pressure relief panels, or explosion relief vents. This course discusses pressure relief in low-strength enclosures, industries requiring pressure relief venting, and the function, design, and installation of these systems.


  • Within building spaces, noise can be reduced by using materials or assemblies that mitigate the transmission or isolate the sound. To do this it is important to understand how sound moves through building materials and partitions and the impact of sound mitigation products. In this course we look at the basics of sound, techniques, and products to prevent sound transmission.


  • Currently, buildings are the single biggest contributor to GHG emissions, accounting for roughly half of all energy consumption in the US and globally. It is crucial to reduce this level of consumption by including high performance envelope strategies like shading systems, in all new building designs. In this course, we will look at shading systems, examine shading and design strategies, and learn tips for successful selection and design.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.


  • Kiln-fired glass is a fine art form with many architectural and interior design applications. This course will explain how kiln-fired glass is produced, what the range of applications are, and how installations can meet architectural glass performance and safety requirements.


  • Redwood Timbers are a safe, strong, and sustainable option for exterior and interior building projects where natural wood is desired. This course provides an overview of the properties of Redwood Timbers including insulation properties, grades, dimensions, fasteners, finishing options, and strength. It concludes with numerous case studies exploring the use of Redwood Timbers for post and beam construction, decorative elements, deck posts, and outdoor living structures.


  • Cleaning is one of the higher continuous operational expenses faced by commercial building owners. Incorporating an entrance flooring system will reduce cleaning costs, improve safety and provide an environmental benefit to the building users. This course reviews entrance flooring system design considerations including code, environmental, safety and aesthetic considerations for high-traffic entrances.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.


  • Exterior shading devices offer a number of advantages that contribute to a more sustainable building, including minimizing cooling costs, reducing peak electricity demand, and controlling glare. These benefits result in greater occupant comfort and improved productivity. This course provides a review of exterior aluminum shading device systems, including the components, finishes, and design and engineering considerations, as well as a discussion of how shading strategies contribute to LEED® accreditation.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.


  • Power and charging needs in hotels, offices, and lobbies have changed due to emerging trends in how people use their electronic devices. Modern users require more and better access to charging. This need combined with the rise of the USB-Type C Standard, new furniture-based power technology, and the challenges of open space design requires designers to apply a new strategy for power/charging outlets. This course discusses how to employ furniture power distribution units (FPDUs) to meet the needs of users, hotel operators, and facility managers.


  • Driven largely by public interest in minimizing the potential environmental impact of building products, architects and builders actively embrace “green” initiatives and are calling for building product transparency. The Environmental Product Declaration (EPD) was developed to address this need. This course examines the EPD and includes discussions on who wants EPDs and why, the EPD development process, the contents of an EPD, and the future of EPDs.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.


  • Daylighting systems provide a sustainable and environmentally conscious solution for building illumination. Daylighting however, is not just about letting in as much light as possible. Instead, it is an intentional and controlled introduction of natural light into a space. This course provides an overview of the benefits and applications of successful daylighting systems with a focus on the characteristics of high-performance translucent technologies, including removable glazing/skin options and two-panel systems. Also included is a discussion on meeting today’s strict code requirements with daylighting technology.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.


  • Exterior shading devices offer a number of advantages that contribute to a more sustainable building, including minimizing cooling costs, reducing peak electricity demand, and controlling glare. These benefits result in greater occupant comfort and improved productivity. This course provides a review of exterior aluminum shading device systems, including the components, finishes, and design and engineering considerations, as well as a discussion of how shading strategies contribute to LEED® accreditation.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.


  • It is an expectation that today’s buildings have to be more than just aesthetically pleasing; they also have to provide flexibility for ever-changing space uses. Sliding hardware systems can improve accessibility, increase access to daylight, and provide innovative space division. This course outlines sliding hardware systems in buildings, examines their advantages over conventional swinging doors in all building types, and discusses how to specify these systems.


  • From “fashion to function,” the shower space of the bathroom is a focal point, offering a quiet respite in which to rejuvenate. Shower spaces should be built to last, using durable materials combined with sound installation practices in order to reduce the life cycle and replacement costs. This course outlines the criteria used in designing water management systems for shower pans and walls. Includes discussions on traditional and modern methods of waterproofing shower floors and walls, new methods of construction, as well as the innovative design options that are available for curbless shower pans.


  • While providing fresh air intake and exhaust, reducing noise, and keeping out unwanted water and debris, louvers can also provide architectural style to a building design. This course discusses the aesthetics and weather resistance features of a variety of louver designs from the basic to the extreme. A discussion about the industry standards and test protocol for louver performance is included.


  • The design of behavioral healthcare facilities should address the therapeutic and safety needs of patients and staff while meeting the applicable codes and regulations. Reviewed in this course are ligature-resistant products developed for patient rooms and bathrooms that strike the balance between providing the safest design solutions while creating a noninstitutional environment.


  • Sustainable restroom design can address the global concerns of water shortages and the impacts of the building sector on our environment. This program identifies the newest technologies in high-efficiency restroom fixtures including how to choose water-saving products and the practical, economic, and environmental benefits of high-speed, energy-efficient hand dryers versus paper towels. Also included is an in-depth analysis of how these products earn points toward LEED® v4 credits and other green building standards to comply with new, best practices in green building.


  • Provides an overview of the characteristics and architectural applications of perforated metal, expanded metal, and wire mesh products including descriptions of metal types and mechanical finishes.


  • While the kitchen has long been considered the heart of the home, the bathroom is often thought of as a utilitarian space. However, by drawing inspiration from kitchen design principles, designers can create a bathroom that’s personalized, organized, and highly functional. Beyond serving basic needs, the bathroom is a space for relaxing, recharging, and preparing for the day ahead. This course discusses strategies for incorporating organization, ergonomics, personalization, and technology to create a streamlined styling space.


  • Moss is the oldest plant on earth. A living, self-contained moss wall comprises 100% live moss plants that have an innate ability to cleanse the air while enhancing the visual aspects of an interior environment. This course discusses the impact living plant walls can have on the interior environment, explores the attributes of moss plants, and explains how live moss walls may be used to incorporate biophilia into interior spaces.

    Prerequisites: No

    Course Level:Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.


  • Phenolic panels are a versatile building material for both interior wall coverings and exterior cladding, and are ideal wherever both durability and appearance are important. This course explains how the manufacturing process imparts a wide range of performance attributes to phenolic panels, discusses their role in sustainable design, and presents the diverse array of applications that benefit from the strength and beauty of phenolic wall panels.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.


  • Authentic sustainability requires a long-term approach to reducing impact on the environment and minimizing operational costs for building owners. This course addresses how to use this approach in restroom design by specifying products that save money, time, and resources, including those that reduce waste and usage of consumables, energy, and water. Guidance is provided on how to communicate to clients the full, long-term value of products that are aesthetically pleasing, sustainable, and easy to maintain so that the original design vision is more likely to endure.

    Prerequisites:No

    Course Level:Introductory

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.


  • Today’s louvers are not only functional but offer enhanced architectural design to the façade of many buildings. More than just a hole in a wall, louvers are responsible for reducing or eliminating water infiltration, and offer protection from heavy storms and hurricanes. Different types of louvers and their applications will be discussed in this course as well as specific terminology and AMCA/BSRIA testing procedures and certified rating programs.


  • The design of health care facilities has become increasingly relevant as health care has moved away from doctors treating illnesses to a more collaborative approach aimed at holistic well-being. The waiting room sets the stage for the doctor’s visit: it can put patients in a bad mood or it can uplift their spirits, educate their minds, and provide a sense of connectivity. Utilizing a real-world case study, this course explores the role of research-based generative design to create waiting rooms that are as much a tool as the doctor’s stethoscope in putting patients on a path to wellness.


  • The cleanliness of rooms in healthcare facilities is critical in preventing patients from contracting life-threatening infections. Along with proper hand hygiene, frequent privacy or cubicle curtain changes help prevent the spread of healthcare associated infections (HAIs). This course examines the social, economic, and operational impact HAIs have on a healthcare organization and explains why removable curtain systems make it easier to keep privacy curtains clear of dangerous pathogens and protect the physical health of the building users.

     This course is part of one or more "Course Collections". Click here to view the details.

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